White Ally Toolkit at SEUL

From Southeast Uplift:

How-does-a-white-person-who-aspires-to-be-an-ally-against-racism-talk-to-their-friends-and-family-who-are-in-denial-about-racism-against-people-of-color_-768x644.png

There is increasing scientific evidence that shows that empathy-based dialogues are the way to go if you want to have a chance to change adults’ minds. According to this research, the best way to foster “debiasing” is to first listen empathetically to skeptics so they feel heard, and after that, raise experiences and facts that invite them to a broader and more nuanced perspective.

But you don’t have to simply take this on faith. Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were hardened after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  2. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were authentically changed for the better after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  3. Have ever been times when you someone listened to you empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped expand your view of a situation?
  4. Have been times when you listened to someone closely and empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped someone else expand their view of a situation?

If anti-racism allies are going to change any minds, empathetic listening will likely be important. But, the anti-racism movement should not expect POCs to empathetically listen to white racism skeptics. White people are in a much better position to execute listening-based strategy with people who are skeptical about whether racism is real.

On a daily basis, POCs must endure the indirect expression of white skepticism that racism really matters, and they must do so as they are they are experiencing overt and subtle racism in many parts of their lives. Some people of color might want to choose to have conversations where white people’s racial skepticism is consciously expressed. But it would not be fair to expect people of color to endure this.

This is a workshop for anyone in the who believes racism still exists and has questioned how to approach the topic of race with other white people in their communities. For more info, check out this website: https://www.whiteallytoolkit.com/

RSVP REQUIRED

If you are unable to pay the $10 cost for the training please contact Muz, muz@seuplift.org, (503) 232-0010 ext 319, for information on how to obtain a scholarship to cover the cost of attending the training.

*Contact Muz at muz@seuplift.org or call (503)232-0010 ext 319 if you require special accommodations.

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LGL Spring Updates

From Learning Gardens Lab:
Spring is finally upon us, and our staff is gearing up for warmer weather and transformation in the garden! Our first work party of the spring season is happening two weeks from today on Saturday, April 14th, from 10am-1pm. We recommend you bring your own water bottle and a light snack to stay energized. Please watch for a follow up email from us next week for details on work party projects.
Other work parties for the season to add to your calendar:
  • Saturday, May 12th, 10:00AM-1:00PM
  • Saturday, June 2nd, 10:00AM-1:00PM
Interested in volunteering more with us this spring? We will be holding a volunteer orientation on Wednesday, April 11th, from 12pm-1pm for anyone interested in learning more about what we do and how to get involved with us! If you are already familiar with LGL, please feel free to join us for our weekly volunteer drop-in hours:
  • Mondays, 9:30AM-12:30PM with Isabelle
  • Tuesdays, 9:00AM-12:00PM with Isabelle
  • Thursdays, 12:00-3:00PM with Brittnee
  • Fridays, 9:00AM-12:00PM with Brittnee
Please contact our Volunteer Coordinators with any questions or concerns you may have regarding volunteering at lglvolunteer@gmail.com.

LGL February Work Party

The Learning Gardens Lab is having a work party on Saturday, February 24th, from 10:00AM-1:00PM. Join them as they prepare for spring growth! Opening circle will begin promptly at 10:00AM.
There are several projects on the agenda for this work party, some of which will be dependent on the weather:
  • Fruit tree pruning
  • Tool care & organization
  • Washing pots for seed starts and the spring plant sale
  • Seed propogation
  • Moving compost into Hügelkultur location
  • Transplanting asparagus
Please dress accordingly, and bring a snack and water to keep yourself energized. The next work party will take place on Saturday, March 10th.

East Precinct Neighborhood Training

The Neighborhood Training by the East Precinct Neighborhood Response Team (NRT) Sgt. Teig, is designed to provide information, resources, and materials available to mitigate public safety and livability issues in East Precinct neighborhoods.   

Training Dates:

  • Saturday, February 10th, 10:00AM-12:00PM
  • Saturday, March 10th, 10:00AM-12:00PM

Trainings are held at the East Precinct Community Room located at 737 SE 106th Ave, Portland, OR 97216.

About the training: This training is geared towards community members, who will then be able to train/share this information with other neighbors. The purpose of the training is to equip you with the tools necessary to train and engage your respective community members regarding East Precinct initiatives about public safety and livability issues. The training is designed to provide information and materials needed to navigate the different resources available for mitigating these issues.

To attend, RSVP to Marianna Lomanto, Crime Prevention Coordinator at Office of Neighborhood Involvement.

 

PBOT Announces Community Grant Projects

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

PBOT announces $100,000 in community projects to fund safety, placemaking, innovation and equity

The Portland Bureau of Transportation is proud to announce the eleven projects that have been selected for the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program. The program was established to support community-driven projects focused on transportation safety, equity, innovation and placemaking. Portlanders were especially encouraged to submit proposals for transportation safety projects in support of Vision Zero, creative community infrastructure projects, events in city streets, urban trail projects and initiatives that support innovative community engagement.

Sixty-three applications were submitted by Portland community and neighborhood groups requesting a total of $736,954. A total of $100,000 was available.

“As these projects clearly show, our communities are overflowing with creative ideas about how to improve their neighborhoods. We are very excited to be partnering on these projects, and we are already learning so much from the thoughtful and innovative ideas that Portlanders brought forward,” said Transportation Director Leah Treat. “I am gratified that we are able to help these communities realize their visions for safer and more attractive streets.”

Eleven grants were awarded to the following projects:

Bridlemile Walkway $3,368

This project will transform a walkway in the Bridlemile neighborhood of SW Portland. The walkway is used by neighbors to access area schools, bus stops and grocery stores and is a part of the SW Trails network.

“Dia de las Niñas y los Niños” Parade and Celebration $3,625

This community event is hosted annually by the Rigler Elementary School PTA to celebrate the Latin American holiday. This year’s event will include a Safe Routes to School theme and promote active transportation options for students and families in the Cully neighborhood.

Heritage Tree Trail $1,200

The University of Portland Neighborhood Association will use this project to promote the use of urban trails and neighborhood greenways, while also increasing awareness of the heritage trees network in their North Portland community.

Lents Green Ring Wayfinding Project $16,000

Green Lents and NAYA Generations, along with other community partners, will utilize these resources to engage community members on the development of a “Green Ring” in Southeast Portland. The “Green Ring” will promote active transportation, incorporate placemaking infrastructure and address safety concerns that have been a barrier to pedestrians and cyclists.

Living Cully Community Wayfinding Project $16,000

This project, led by Verde and Living Cully community partners, will complete a bilingual wayfinding system that will encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to six green spaces in the Cully community, including Thomas Cully Park scheduled to open in 2018.

NE 85th Street Community Greenspace and Intersection Repair $3,675

Neighbors in the Beech Milton community (near Madison High School) will utilize these funds to address pedestrian safety concerns and revive two intersection paintings, with a special focus on engaging diverse community members and local schools.

Painted Curb in Sullivan’s Gulch $8,550

This project seeks to address pedestrian safety concerns at the intersection of NE 21st Avenue and NE Clackamas Street. The rapidly growing Sullivan’s Gulch community has identified this as a problematic area for pedestrians seeking to access neighborhood grocery stores and transit.

Rosewood Center Parklet $9,785

The Rosewood Initiative will utilize these resources to facilitate the development of community identity markers and wayfinding signage that promotes the use of neighborhood greenways, highlights community spaces, and directs pedestrians to transit stops in Outer East Portland.

Safety Corridor for Deaf Children $16,000

Tucker Maxon School for the deaf will utilize these resources to address safety concerns near their school at SE Holgate and SE 28th. Their project vision includes speed bumps, maintenance of a gravel road and artistic placemaking.

ULPDX Williams Ave & Russell St Project $16,000

Led by the Urban League of Portland, and in partnership with Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative, this project will facilitate community beautification with the implementation of creative placemaking that celebrates the rich history of this intersection and community.

Urban Trails Maintenance and Construction in Southwest $5,500

SW Trails PDX will utilize these funds to improve community connectivity with an urban trail maintenance project of steps on SW Trail #1 from SW Twombly Ave to SW Melville Ave.

The Portland in the Streets Community Grant applications were due August 31, 2017. During the application period, eighty-two community members attended three informational workshops that provided more information and made staff available for technical questions. With the support of consults from Design + Culture Lab, there was also an intentional effort to solicit ideas from communities that have historically been underserved by City services and programming. Applications were scored for (1) project feasibility; (2) community partnerships and equity; (3) transportation and safety benefit; and (4) livability and community placemaking.

The selected projects will be supported by teams of PBOT staff across the bureau who will provide technical assistance informed by the priorities of the Livable Streets Strategy and Vision Zero, as well as other areas of PBOT work. PBOT will seek City Council authorization to continue the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program in future years. The timeline for year two of the program has not yet been determined.

Project progress can be tracked on PBOT’s website and Facebook page.

Resolve to Resist: A Civic Engagement Series

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement:

Does your New Year’s Resolution include Making Change? Get a start by attending the YWCA’s Resolve to Resist Civic Engagement Series

Looking to make change this year?
Attend the YWCA’s “Resolve to Resist” series

Resolve to Resist: A Civic Engagement Series is two sessions to encourage women, and others, who don’t see themselves represented in the political arena to take the lead. The first session is Thursday, February 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Multicultural Service Center, 4610 S.E. Belmont Street.

Session 1: Warm Up and Stretch is for people curious to get appointed and serve on local commissions, boards, and task forces. It will cover:

  • Getting appointed to local leadership opportunities
  • Serving on local commissions, boards, and task forces
  • Expectations, opportunities and barriers to civic involvement

Hear how others have done it: how they started and what their journeys looked like. Learn about culturally and gender-specific resources and leadership programs available to help you GET READY to RUN! Both sessions are informative and interactive.

For more information about the session, including accessibility accommodation, requesting childcare, and registration, visit the Resolve to Resist: Session 1 website.