White Ally Toolkit at SEUL

From Southeast Uplift:

How-does-a-white-person-who-aspires-to-be-an-ally-against-racism-talk-to-their-friends-and-family-who-are-in-denial-about-racism-against-people-of-color_-768x644.png

There is increasing scientific evidence that shows that empathy-based dialogues are the way to go if you want to have a chance to change adults’ minds. According to this research, the best way to foster “debiasing” is to first listen empathetically to skeptics so they feel heard, and after that, raise experiences and facts that invite them to a broader and more nuanced perspective.

But you don’t have to simply take this on faith. Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were hardened after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  2. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were authentically changed for the better after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  3. Have ever been times when you someone listened to you empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped expand your view of a situation?
  4. Have been times when you listened to someone closely and empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped someone else expand their view of a situation?

If anti-racism allies are going to change any minds, empathetic listening will likely be important. But, the anti-racism movement should not expect POCs to empathetically listen to white racism skeptics. White people are in a much better position to execute listening-based strategy with people who are skeptical about whether racism is real.

On a daily basis, POCs must endure the indirect expression of white skepticism that racism really matters, and they must do so as they are they are experiencing overt and subtle racism in many parts of their lives. Some people of color might want to choose to have conversations where white people’s racial skepticism is consciously expressed. But it would not be fair to expect people of color to endure this.

This is a workshop for anyone in the who believes racism still exists and has questioned how to approach the topic of race with other white people in their communities. For more info, check out this website: https://www.whiteallytoolkit.com/

RSVP REQUIRED

If you are unable to pay the $10 cost for the training please contact Muz, muz@seuplift.org, (503) 232-0010 ext 319, for information on how to obtain a scholarship to cover the cost of attending the training.

*Contact Muz at muz@seuplift.org or call (503)232-0010 ext 319 if you require special accommodations.

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SPARC Community Kickoff Event

WHEN: Monday, March 19, 2018, 5:30 to 7:30PM
WHERE: Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark, Portland, OR

Come to Revolution Hall from 5:30 to 7:30 PMon March 19 to kick off of a community-led initiative designed to explore and address racism as a driver of homelessness, and disparities among homelessness, in Multnomah County.

The initiative is named SPARC (Supporting Partnerships for Anti-Racist Communities), and it’s coming to Multnomah County this year to build on research into roots and best practices already under way in 10 other communities. SPARC is an initiative of the Center for Social Innovation (C4).

The March 19 gathering is part of a week of events for community members, service providers and other key partners. The kickoff event will include light refreshments and a panel discussion featuring local leaders and service providers. SPARC will then spend the year working closely with community members and partners in A Home for Everyone, our community’s nearly four-year-old effort to address homelessness.

RSVP for the free event to reserve your spot at sparcportland.eventbrite.com

The Space Between Us: Immigrants, Refugees and Oregon

From Southeast Uplift:

The Space Between Us: Immigrants, Refugees and Oregon

FREE DISCUSSION ABOUT IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES IN OREGON

The February 26th event is part of Oregon Humanities’ statewide Conversation Project. Interpretation services in Spanish available, please let Muz at Southeast Uplift know if anyone needs other accommodations.

August Wilson Monologue Competition

From The Red Door Project:

August Wilson Monologue Competition, Portland Regional Finals on February 26!

GET READY TO EMERGE!

A diverse group of high school students performing August Wilson, the foremost chronicler of the African-American experience in dramatic literature; world-class musicians Darrell Grant, Bobby Torres, Redray Frazier, DJ David van Overeem, Mic Crenshaw, and Oluyinka Akinjiola and Rejoice! Diaspora Dance Theater!

We welcome photography throughout the evening from press sources including, but not limited to, behind-the-scenes access to watch student participants warming up and witness the powerful interactions between students and teaching artists before the show.

This event is tailor-made for photographic journalism and provides a compelling story about what can happen when we mix it up and see what emerges.

WHO: Portland-area high school students, world class musicians. Kevin Jones, founder of the August Wilson Red Door Project, award winning actor and director. Popular Portland actress, Chantal DeGroat emcees.

WHAT:  The August Wilson Monologue Competition Portland Regional Finals

WHEN: February 26, 2018, Doors open at 6:30pm, Show begins at 7:00pm.

WHERE: Newmark Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97205

Support the celebration and elevation of the African-American culture in Portland. For more information about the AWMC and the August Wilson Red Door Project, visit http://www.reddoorproject.org/awmc. Contact Jory Bowers, Operations Coordinator, at jory@reddoorproject.org to coordinate your participation in our Regional Finals event.

For more information, media inquiries and press access:

Contact: Jory Bowers, Operations Coordinator, (612) 239-4449 or jory@reddoorproject.org

Aging and People with Disabilities 2018 Legislative Stakeholders Teleconference Call

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement:

ODHS Aging & People with Disabilities 2018 Legislative Stakeholders Teleconference Calls start February 7th, 2018

The Oregon Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) Director’s office has announced it will once again be holding Legislative Conference Calls during the 2018 State Legislative Session. The meetings are telephonic only and can be accessed at 1-877-336-1829. The participant code to enter is 8307334#.

The dates and times of the conference calls will be:

  • Wednesday, February 7th, from Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, February 21st, from Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 7th, from Noon to 1 p.m.

It is hoped that those interested in following the legislative issues regarding aging Oregonians and Oregonians with disabilities will be able to participate. More information about services for seniors and people with disabilities may go to the Oregon Department of Human Services website.

Multnomah County Movie Screening and Community Listening Session on Mental Health

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement:

Multnomah County holding a Movie Screening & Community Listening Session on Mental Health on February 6

Due to a tremendous response to the December Community Listening Session on Mental Health, Multnomah County Commissioner Sharon Meieran is hosting another session that includes a movie screening on Tuesday, February 6. This Movie Screening & Community Listening Session on Mental Health will be from 6 to 8 p.m. in the First Floor Boardroom of the Multnomah County Building at 501 S.E. Hawthorne Boulevard.

All are welcome to attend and the event is free. Seating is limited, so those who wish to attend should RSVP by February 1. The effort will be made to accommodate as many attendees as possible, but seating can only be guaranteed to those who RSVP.

The movie, Not Broken , is a one-hour documentary by Arizona Public Media about youth who have lived experience of mental illness. This event offers the opportunity to watch Not Broken as a community and share thoughts about a better mental health system. The county is especially interested in hearing about youth and family experiences. The information gathered will inform the deep analysis of the local mental health system by Multnomah County and Human Services Research Institute.

For those who wish to provide feedback about the mental health care system in Multnomah County but cannot attend the listening session, they can do so via the county’s feedback form, which will remain open until February 28.

Light snacks will be provided at the listening session, and childcare and translation services are available by request. Anyone who RSVPs should let us know if childcare, translation services, or any other accommodations are needed so that we may plan accordingly.

Anyone who has questions or needs further information may contact Commissioner Meieran by phone at 503-988-5220 or email to district1@multco.us.

PBOT Disability Parking Survey

PBOT is evaluating disability parking spaces in metered areas in an effort to improve access and provide an easier parking experience for those with disabilities. The information they are interested in learning relates to the current use of the existing disability parking spaces and desired new/re-allocated locations. Please help by providing your feedback in their Disability Parking Survey.