Notice of Proposed Changes to Inclusionary Housing

The public is invited to testify on proposed changes to the Inclusionary Housing Homeownership program, HOU-3.04.VII.B. For-sale units.

Proposed changes to administrative rules at the Portland Housing Bureau require a 60-day public notification prior to the effective date of the rule and a public hearing must be held where testimony can be heard. 
The homeownership section of Inclusionary Housing establishes participant eligibility, income qualification, unit sale price and resale price formulas, among other items. 
The proposed changes can be found on the Portland Housing Bureau website at www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/IHdraft. Paper copies will also be available at the Portland Housing Bureau located at 421 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 500
Written testimony must be received by or on the date of the hearing. You must include your first and last name in your testimony to be officially considered.

 

To Submit Your Testimony

Testimony may be submitted via email, fax, letter or in person.
Portland Housing Bureau
c/o IH Testimony
421 SW 6th Ave., Suite 500

Portland, Oregon 97204
  • In personWednesday, February 21, 6-8pm
Portland Housing Bureau
421 SW 6th Ave., Suite 500
Portland, Oregon 97204
If you need translation services at the hearing, please contact Jessica Conner, Inclusionary Housing Homeownership Rules Coordinator, at 503-823-4100 at least 3 days prior to the hearing. 

 

At the Hearing

If you would like to testify, you will need to fill out a testifier card when you arrive and hand it to the assigned staff member.

When your name is called, go up to the table for testifiers. Speak into the microphone. Each person will be given two minutes to state their testimony. Begin by stating your name as well as any group or organization you are testifying on behalf of. If you have written materials, you can give them to a staff member before you testify.

 

Tips:
  • It can be helpful to prepare an outline of what you want to say or even write it all out. Practicing a few times can also be beneficial.
  • Focus on the major points you want to make. You can submit letters with more detail.
  • Repetitive testimony is not always as effective as a planned, coordinated presentation. If you are aware of other people who plan to testify who share your feelings, you can organize a few main speakers from your group to speak about different topics related to the project. 
  • If you require special visual, audio or other accommodations to testify, please contactJessica Conner, the Rules Coordinator at the Portland Housing Bureau, at least five business days before the meeting with your request. 
If you have questions regarding the proposed rule changes or the rulemaking process, please contact the Inclusionary Housing Homeownership Rules Coordinator: 
Jessica Conner, Housing Policy Planner
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Bond Oversight Committee Meets February 1, 2018

From Portland Housing Bureau:

Thursday, February 1, 2018 from 6:30-8:30 PM

IRCO Community Room

10301 NE Glisan Street

Portland, OR 97220

Mayor Ted Wheeler will join the committee for February’s Meeting in East PortlandTopics for discussion include: (1) the draft Community Engagement Plan; and (2) new tenant screening criteria.

This event is free and refreshments will be served. Please click here to RSVP. Your RSVP helps us plan for food, materials, childcare, and other accomodations,  but it is not required to attend.

Bond Oversight Committee meetings are open to the public and public testimony is invited. Agendas and meeting materials will be posted online here.

For more information about Portland’s Housing Bond, visit us online at www.portlandhousingbond.com

Sign up here to recieve email notifications about upcoming meetings and related updates.

City of Portland Home Energy Score Requirement Beginning Soon

From City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:
City of Portland Home Energy Score requirement beginning soon 

Program provides new insight into energy use and costs of Portland homes.

Know the score. Outsmart energy waste. www.pdxhes.com

PORTLAND, Ore. – The City of Portland Home Energy Score ordinance will take effect on January 1, 2018, requiring sellers of single-family homes to disclose a Home Energy Report and Score at time of listing. Portland City Council unanimously adopted the policy (Portland City Code Chapter 17.108) in December 2016. This new policy will require people publicly selling single-family homes to obtain a Home Energy Report (which includes a Home Energy Score) from an authorized Home Energy Assessor. Complying with the policy takes two simple steps: getting the Home Energy Score and showing the Home Energy Score in any listing or public posting about the house.
Like a miles-per-gallon rating for a car, a Home Energy Score is an easy way for sellers, buyers, real estate professionals and builders to get directly comparable and credible information about a home’s energy performance across the housing market.

In advance of the policy taking effect, the City of Portland Home Energy Score website is now live at www.pdxhes.com.

  • For sellers, the website explains the necessary actions for completing the requirement and answers questions about logistics, how to get a home assessed and how to improve scores.
  • Buyers are guided through the Home Energy Report and are prompted to wrap energy improvement projects into financing.
  • Real-estate professionals can learn how to make the new policy work effortlessly for their clients and how to post scores online.
  • Builders can find information about how to obtain a score based on construction plans and possible exemptions and waivers.
  • The website is also a place to find out how to become a Home Energy Assessor.
Portland is the second city in the country, behind Berkeley, California, to approve a local ordinance requiring homes to be scored. The Home Energy Score and the Home Energy Report must be provided in any real-estate listings, such as RMLS, and must be made available to prospective buyers. Portland is the first city in the US to require energy scores this early in the homebuying process.
The adoption of the Home Energy Score ordinance is part of an effort to reduce carbon emissions in Multnomah County by 80 percent by 2050, outlined in the 2015 Climate Action Plan. Residential buildings contribute nearly half of all emissions from buildings, and while voluntary efforts have already made a difference, this policy will accelerate change and provide consumer insight and protection.

“A Home Energy Score lets buyers ‘see inside the walls’ of a home they’re considering for purchase, making the full costs of homeownership more visible to prospective buyers,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler. “Cutting the energy costs of housing is one of the smartest strategies to keep housing affordable over the long term. Beyond lowering energy bills, energy‐efficient homes are more comfortable and have better air quality. I’m proud that Portland is taking a stand for consumer protections and climate actionmaking it easier for people to save energy, protect against rising energy prices in the future and reduce carbon pollution.”

The scores will be produced by third-party Home Energy Assessors authorized by the City of Portland and Earth Advantage. The growing list of authorized professionals can be found atwww.earthadvantage.org/pdxhes/assessors.html. The price of the Home Energy Report is determined by the private sector, but Home Energy Assessments in similar programs in other communities range in price from $150 to $250. In 2018, the City will offer free Home Energy Scores for income-qualified sellers.
The Home Energy Assessment takes about an hour, and 70 pieces of information about insulation, windows, appliances and more are observed and recorded. As soon as the data from the assessment has been entered into the software, the Home Energy Score and Report will be available. Homes will be scored on a ten-point scale. If a home scores a 5, it is expected to perform comparably to an average home in Portland in terms of energy use. If a home scores a 10, it ranks among the ten percent of homes expected to use the least amount of energy. A home scoring a 1 is estimated to consume more energy each year than 85 percent of homes. Homes that have received a Home Energy Score will be viewable at the Portland Green Building Registry.
No action is required by the seller beyond providing the score and report in listings and in the home while it’s for sale, but if sellers or buyers are interested in making energy improvements, the nonprofit Enhabit offers free consultations with expert home energy advisors. For low-cost, do-it-yourself ways to cut energy waste, increase comfort and lower energy bills, Energy Trust of Oregon provides resources at www.energytrust.org/tips.
For more information, visit www.pdxhes.com, or contact HESinfo@portlandoregon.gov  or the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability at 503-823-5771

City Seeks Proposals for Portland’s Housing Bond

The Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) released a Request for Interest (RFI) on October 23, 2017, seeking opportunities to acquire land or existing residential buildings of twenty units or more.

Portland voters approved Portland’s Housing Bond in 2016, authorizing the City to issue up to $258.4 million in general obligation bonds for the development or acquisition of affordable housing. PHB expects to build and purchase a minimum of 1,300 housing units with these funds.  Property owners, their representatives, and developers may now begin submitting proposals for Portland’s Housing Bond.

Read the full article on Portland’s website.

Portland Housing Bureau 2017 Racial Equity Forum

2017 Racial Equity Forum – Portland Housing Bureau
New Song Community Center, 220 NE Russell Street, Portland, OR 97212
Tuesday, September 12 2017, 8:30AM-11:30AM

Learn about the Portland Housing Bureau’s efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects.

Featuring Special Guest, Derek Hyra, Author of “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City”

Click here to RSVP

The Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) invites you to join us on September 12, 2017 for our Annual Racial Equity Forum to learn about our efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects. This year’s program will include a review of PHB policies and the impact they have had on the diversity within PHB’s housing portfolio, as well as a keynote address from special guest speaker Derek Hyra, Associate Professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University. Professor Hyra’s research focuses on processes of neighborhood change, with an emphasis on housing, metropolitan politics, and race. He is the author of Race, Class and Politics in the Cappuccino City.

If you have any questions about this event or need to request an accommodation, contact Kim McCarty at 503-823-5312.