82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development

Learn more at our January 3rd, 2019 Public Board Meeting!

The 82nd Avenue Study: Understanding Barriers to Development, referred to as the “82nd Avenue Study,” focuses on understanding the challenges of and exploring opportunities for new development in the corridor as we consider potential transportation improvements. The 82nd Avenue Study describes the development potential of properties along 82nd Avenue and identifies barriers that can be addressed in the near-term — with an eye towards long-term solutions.

PROJECT GOALS

The goals of this study are:

  • Update our understanding of 82nd Avenue as a “Civic Corridor.”
  • Identify the most strategic locations for public action or investment support for businesses and property development on 82nd Avenue.
  • Generate policy recommendations to address physical and social needs in the corridor; address barriers to development while managing equity and social issues.

The 82nd Avenue Study is not intended to be comprehensive planning effort for the corridor. Rather, it will complement the many other projects also happening in the corridor and build on collaborative efforts. Following this study, City Council could direct staff to generate a more robust future “82nd Avenue Plan,” in partnership with community stakeholders.

The 82nd Avenue Study recommends near-term actions and future planning and investment efforts:

Near-term actions

BPS

  • Rezone EG2 properties to EG1 on the southern end of the corridor to address barriers to development and for more efficient urban development of employment land along the corridor. Review split-zoned properties and propose necessary adjustments to remove any barriers to development. At the same time conduct an economic, equity and impact analysis specific to commercial displacement.

PBOT

  • Propose changes to the City’s right-of-way dedication requirements for new development along 82nd Avenue by making the private property dedication for the public ROW the same as the current 90-foot (measured 45-feet from centerline) Special Setback in the Zoning Code.
  • City of Portland to carry out already funded transportation projects and continue to develop additional opportunities for safety and connectivity improvements in and around the corridor. The already funded transportation projects include:
      • 82nd Ave Crossing Improvements Fixing our Streets project (2019-2020)
      • Division Multi-Modal Safety Project (2019-2020)
      • 70s Neighborhood Greenway Project (2020-21)
      • Halsey Safety Access to Transit Projects (2020-21)
      • Jade and Montavilla Connected Centers Project (2020-21)
      • Brentwood-Darlington Safe Routes to School (2020-21)
  • City and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) will develop a broad and successful partnership to secure funding to repair 82nd Ave and improve safety. This will support the future jurisdictional transfer of 82nd Avenue within the City of Portland limits and future planned improvements.
  • City intends to seek increased design and engineering flexibility for improvements made under ODOT ownership.
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PPR Seeks to Close Road for Errol Heights Park

Portland Parks and Recreation (PPR) is seeking to close SE Tenino Court (from SE Tenino Court at SE Tenino Drive to SE Tenino Court at the east end of the Community Garden – see yellow line in aerial photo below) through the Portland Bureau of Transportation.

image001 (1)SE Tenino Court Closure Flyer

Errol Heights Park Preliminary Plans

Below are the preliminary plans, as presented to the Errol Heights Park Citizen Advisory Committee.  Want to know more or ask about these plans?  Come to the BDNA All-Committees meeting on Tuesday, August 21, 7:00-9:00PM, at the Brentwood-Darlington Community Center (7211 SE 62nd Ave, 97206) and talk to the Portland Parks and Recreation project staff in person!  Portland Bureau of Transportation will also be present to discuss how their Errol Heights projects affect the park.

Click here to take the neighbor generated survey regarding Errol Heights Park before August 19th!

Option 1 ACTIVE - PAC 3

Option 1 – Passive

Option 2 Passive PAC 3

Option 2 – Active

Errol Heights LID Receives Neighborhood Support

From Portland Bureau of Transportation: 

EHLIDGraph

Throughout the month of May, PBOT collected petitions of support for the Errol Heights LID, held meetings in the neighborhood with property owners, and answered a variety of questions and concerns about proposed changes in the neighborhood.

Errol Heights property owners have turned in 57 petitions supporting the LID. Waivered properties plus non-waivered supporters reached 62% (properties with waivers of remonstrance are counted as automatic supporters of the LID). Even if we didn’t count waivered properties as automatic yes votes, the LID still received close to 50% support (currently at about 48%).

While this level of support sends a strong signal to City Council that the neighborhood is behind the project, more petitions are always better. It’s not too late for your support to be counted. Petitions can still be mailed in using the prepaid envelope from the packet. Contact us if you need any help.

The date for the LID Formation Hearing at City Council is still pending but will likely occur in August or September. We plan on sending a followup email in July with more information.

What’s next? Click the graphic below for a step by step guide to the LID process.

EHLIDNext

For more information contact: Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager or click here.

Errol Heights LID Petitions Due May 30

Reminder about the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project

Petitions of support were mailed to all property owners within the LID boundary in April (see map below). Don’t forget to send yours in if you support the project to improve streets and stormwater infrastructure in Errol Heights. We will be posting results of the petition process in early June.

Need a new petition, or have questions about the project? Please email, call, or find us online:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

EH)LID

Note: Map is ONLY to show which properties are included in LID. It does not show future alignment of SE Tenino CT or other street reconfigurations.

“Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

From Portland Bureau of Transportation: 

PBOT, Multnomah County Library and Metro celebrate Bike Month by bringing back “Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Multnomah County Library, with support from Metro, are celebrating Bike Month with “Bike to Books,” a program to encourage residents to ride their bicycle to their local library.

As part of the program, PBOT and Multnomah County Library are bringing back Portland’s “Bike to Books” Bike Month coloring contest. Students living in Multnomah County from Pre-Kindergarten to 12th Grade are invited to design bike lane art for installation in one of the City’s bike lanes. Portland’s bike lane art, found in bike lanes and on neighborhood greenways across the city, is well known nationwide. Designs are created by crew members on their own time using leftover materials that would otherwise go to waste. In 2017, in the first year of our Bike to Books program, PBOT crews installed four winning Bike to Books bike lane art designs near each winning artist’s neighborhood library branch.

It’s easy to enter, with a variety of great prizes. Young people in Portland and Multnomah County can submit their own designs using the bike symbol coloring page. The winning art will be installed on a bike lane this summer by one of PBOT’s striping crews. Second prize winners will each receive four full-day passes to ride your bicycle at the Lumberyard Bike Park (including rental bikes and safety equipment if needed) and third prize winners will win a bike helmet from Portland-based Nutcase Helmets. Coloring pages can be picked up at all Multnomah County Library branches (click here for locations) or downloaded online. Contestants must drop-off their entry at a library branch in person, to be entered into the contest. Full contest rules are available online.

In addition to the coloring contest, every person who bikes to a Multnomah County Library branch will receive a free bike light provided by Metro (while supplies last). Special Bike Storytimes for young readers are also being offered at numerous library branches across the county.

 “We want every Portlander to feel they have a voice in the way we design our city and the earlier we can get our residents involved the better,” PBOT Director Leah Treat said. “This student-designed bike lane art is, in many ways, the beginning of the conversation between PBOT and the young people of Portland who will use our roads, bikeways and sidewalks for decades to come. If they can design such creative art for our streets, imagine the other ideas they’ll bring to us in the future. We’re excited and we’re listening.”

“Libraries are about creating connections for people of all ages to learn and create,” said Multnomah County Library Director Vailey Oehlke. “With Bike to Books, we’re teaming up with important partners in PBOT and Metro to share the joy around reading, learning and biking with an eye toward safety and sustainability.”

Books and bikes are two pillars of Portland culture. One of the busiest public libraries in the United States, Multnomah County Library is beloved by the community it serves. In addition, Portland’s young readers bike to school in record numbers. Today, thanks to PBOT’s Safe Routes to School Program, 36.8 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike – among the highest in the nation.

Portland Bike Month runs throughout the month of May with events happening across the city sponsored by multiple organizations to encourage people of all ages to get on their bike and enjoy the spring sunshine and hundreds of miles of bike lanes and neighborhood greenways in the city of Portland.

Information about Bike to Books and Bike Month events can be found at: www.biketobooks.com

LID Packets Hit Mailboxes Soon

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

LID Petition Packets Mailed Week of April 16th 

In the next week, expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by May 30, 2018

LID Informational Sessions at Errol Heights Park

Questions about the LID or your individual assessment? Meet with PBOT project team (and also have the chance to turn in your vote in person). All meetings will be in the park across from the Community Garden. Look for the white tent and drop in anytime during the hours below.

  • April 30, 7 AM – 9 AM
  • May 3, 5 PM – 7 PM
  • May 4, 11 AM – 1 PM

Unable to make any of the meeting times? Let us know and we can set up a phone call or in-person meeting at a separate time.

Next Steps and Timeline

May 30: Petitions due to PBOT. If over 50% of property owners in proposed LID support its formation, a City Council hearing date will be set.

June 27: Target City Council hearing date

  • 21 calendar days prior to council hearing: mailers will be sent out to each property owner with hearing and LID details
  • 14 calendar days prior to council hearing: two notices of intent to form LID published in a paper of general circulation in the City and two signs placed within the LID boundary
  • 7 calendar days prior to council hearing: remonstrances against LID formation due to City Auditor in writing (delivered in person or by first class U.S. mail to: 1221 SW 4th AVE. Room 310, Portland OR 97204)

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Project contact info:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

 David Backes, Capital Project Assistant: 503.823.5811

NOTE: Elizabeth will be out of the office April 6-24. David will be answering questions in her absence.

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh