Errol Heights LID Petitions Due May 30

Reminder about the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project

Petitions of support were mailed to all property owners within the LID boundary in April (see map below). Don’t forget to send yours in if you support the project to improve streets and stormwater infrastructure in Errol Heights. We will be posting results of the petition process in early June.

Need a new petition, or have questions about the project? Please email, call, or find us online:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

EH)LID

Note: Map is ONLY to show which properties are included in LID. It does not show future alignment of SE Tenino CT or other street reconfigurations.

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“Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

From Portland Bureau of Transportation: 

PBOT, Multnomah County Library and Metro celebrate Bike Month by bringing back “Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Multnomah County Library, with support from Metro, are celebrating Bike Month with “Bike to Books,” a program to encourage residents to ride their bicycle to their local library.

As part of the program, PBOT and Multnomah County Library are bringing back Portland’s “Bike to Books” Bike Month coloring contest. Students living in Multnomah County from Pre-Kindergarten to 12th Grade are invited to design bike lane art for installation in one of the City’s bike lanes. Portland’s bike lane art, found in bike lanes and on neighborhood greenways across the city, is well known nationwide. Designs are created by crew members on their own time using leftover materials that would otherwise go to waste. In 2017, in the first year of our Bike to Books program, PBOT crews installed four winning Bike to Books bike lane art designs near each winning artist’s neighborhood library branch.

It’s easy to enter, with a variety of great prizes. Young people in Portland and Multnomah County can submit their own designs using the bike symbol coloring page. The winning art will be installed on a bike lane this summer by one of PBOT’s striping crews. Second prize winners will each receive four full-day passes to ride your bicycle at the Lumberyard Bike Park (including rental bikes and safety equipment if needed) and third prize winners will win a bike helmet from Portland-based Nutcase Helmets. Coloring pages can be picked up at all Multnomah County Library branches (click here for locations) or downloaded online. Contestants must drop-off their entry at a library branch in person, to be entered into the contest. Full contest rules are available online.

In addition to the coloring contest, every person who bikes to a Multnomah County Library branch will receive a free bike light provided by Metro (while supplies last). Special Bike Storytimes for young readers are also being offered at numerous library branches across the county.

 “We want every Portlander to feel they have a voice in the way we design our city and the earlier we can get our residents involved the better,” PBOT Director Leah Treat said. “This student-designed bike lane art is, in many ways, the beginning of the conversation between PBOT and the young people of Portland who will use our roads, bikeways and sidewalks for decades to come. If they can design such creative art for our streets, imagine the other ideas they’ll bring to us in the future. We’re excited and we’re listening.”

“Libraries are about creating connections for people of all ages to learn and create,” said Multnomah County Library Director Vailey Oehlke. “With Bike to Books, we’re teaming up with important partners in PBOT and Metro to share the joy around reading, learning and biking with an eye toward safety and sustainability.”

Books and bikes are two pillars of Portland culture. One of the busiest public libraries in the United States, Multnomah County Library is beloved by the community it serves. In addition, Portland’s young readers bike to school in record numbers. Today, thanks to PBOT’s Safe Routes to School Program, 36.8 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike – among the highest in the nation.

Portland Bike Month runs throughout the month of May with events happening across the city sponsored by multiple organizations to encourage people of all ages to get on their bike and enjoy the spring sunshine and hundreds of miles of bike lanes and neighborhood greenways in the city of Portland.

Information about Bike to Books and Bike Month events can be found at: www.biketobooks.com

LID Packets Hit Mailboxes Soon

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

LID Petition Packets Mailed Week of April 16th 

In the next week, expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by May 30, 2018

LID Informational Sessions at Errol Heights Park

Questions about the LID or your individual assessment? Meet with PBOT project team (and also have the chance to turn in your vote in person). All meetings will be in the park across from the Community Garden. Look for the white tent and drop in anytime during the hours below.

  • April 30, 7 AM – 9 AM
  • May 3, 5 PM – 7 PM
  • May 4, 11 AM – 1 PM

Unable to make any of the meeting times? Let us know and we can set up a phone call or in-person meeting at a separate time.

Next Steps and Timeline

May 30: Petitions due to PBOT. If over 50% of property owners in proposed LID support its formation, a City Council hearing date will be set.

June 27: Target City Council hearing date

  • 21 calendar days prior to council hearing: mailers will be sent out to each property owner with hearing and LID details
  • 14 calendar days prior to council hearing: two notices of intent to form LID published in a paper of general circulation in the City and two signs placed within the LID boundary
  • 7 calendar days prior to council hearing: remonstrances against LID formation due to City Auditor in writing (delivered in person or by first class U.S. mail to: 1221 SW 4th AVE. Room 310, Portland OR 97204)

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Project contact info:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

 David Backes, Capital Project Assistant: 503.823.5811

NOTE: Elizabeth will be out of the office April 6-24. David will be answering questions in her absence.

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

Paving Project on SE 50th Avenue

PBOT News Release:

SE 50th Avenue Paving Project kicks off 2018 Fixing Our Streets construction season.  PBOT to invest a total of $105 million in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation broke ground today on the SE 50th Avenue Paving Project, the first Fixing Our Streetsproject of the 2018 construction season. The first of 19 projects breaking ground between March and August, the $1.1 million project will pave the street from SE Hawthorne to SE Division and update street corners with ADA ramps to prevent further pavement deterioration and improve overall street accessibility. Work on SE 50th Avenue will require intermittent lane and sidewalk closures as workers begin curb ramp construction on the 26 street corners slated for ADA curb ramp upgrades through late May, before requiring additional lane closures and detours for paving work in June. The project will be completed in late June.

The 19 projects going to construction this spring and summer range from a $200,000 Neighborhood Greenway on SW/NW 20th to a $3.5 million paving project on SW Vermont Street from SW Oleson Road to SW Capitol Highway. In total, approximately $20 million in Fixing Our Streets projects will begin construction in the next six months.

Construction will impact neighborhoods across the city, with projects taking place in all five quadrants of the city. Among them:

East Portland:

North Portland:

NE Portland:

SE Portland:

NW Portland:

SW Portland:

In addition, PBOT’s maintenance bureau workers continue their ongoing, Fixing Our Streets funded work of guard rail replacement and base repair street replacement. Fixing Our Streets projects make up approximately 20 percent of the investments in Portland’s transportation infrastructure this construction season, with a total of approximately $105 million being invested in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Fixing Our Streets program, paid for by a local gas tax approved by Portland voters in May 2016 and a heavy vehicle use tax, is Portland’s first street repair and traffic safety program financed with local funding. 56 percent of Fixing Our Streets funding is invested in street maintenance and 44 percent is invested in safety improvements. The City Council ordinance included a project list that shows specific projects that are intended to be funded. The list of projects can be found at www.fixingourstreets.com.

About the Fixing Our Streets Program

The Fixing Our Streets program is the result of the passage of Measure 26-173, a 10-cent tax on motor vehicle fuels and Portland’s first local funding source dedicated to street repair and traffic safety projects. Passed on May 17, 2016, Measure 26-173 will raise an estimated $64 million over four years. PBOT will invest this money in a wide variety of street improvement and safety projects across the entire city. Fixing Our Streets will help PBOT expand preventive street maintenance that saves money and prevents potholes. It will support our work to make it safer for children to walk to school. It will allow us to build more sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights and bike lanes. The Portland City Council also unanimously passed a Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, for vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, which will also fund the Fixing Our Streets program.

Errol Heights Update and Next Steps

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

Thank you to everyone who completed the recent online survey regarding street design for the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project. Survey respondents strongly preferred the less expensive shared-street design (votes came in 3 to 1 for this treatment).

The shared street design applies to 48th, 49th, 51st, Tenino Drive, and Nehalem Street, while SE Tenino Court and SE Malden Drive both require sidewalk on one side (see map below for properties included in the LID).

With your feedback, we were able to go in to more detail on the design and have completed a cost estimate for the project.

It is now time for LID participants to submit petitions for the project.

In the next month, please expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Cost estimate details
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by April 30, 2018

LID Info sessions – 1st week of April:

The mailer will also include details of upcoming meetings where Errol Heights neighbors can come speak with PBOT staff about the LID process and ask questions about their individual LID assessments. The location and times are TBD but will be near the neighborhood, with morning, daytime, and evening sessions. These dates will also be posted on the project website.

For any questions in the meantime, please get in touch with us and keep an eye on the project website for the most up-to-date information.

Project contact info: Elizabeth Mahon

503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

PBOT Announces Community Grant Projects

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

PBOT announces $100,000 in community projects to fund safety, placemaking, innovation and equity

The Portland Bureau of Transportation is proud to announce the eleven projects that have been selected for the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program. The program was established to support community-driven projects focused on transportation safety, equity, innovation and placemaking. Portlanders were especially encouraged to submit proposals for transportation safety projects in support of Vision Zero, creative community infrastructure projects, events in city streets, urban trail projects and initiatives that support innovative community engagement.

Sixty-three applications were submitted by Portland community and neighborhood groups requesting a total of $736,954. A total of $100,000 was available.

“As these projects clearly show, our communities are overflowing with creative ideas about how to improve their neighborhoods. We are very excited to be partnering on these projects, and we are already learning so much from the thoughtful and innovative ideas that Portlanders brought forward,” said Transportation Director Leah Treat. “I am gratified that we are able to help these communities realize their visions for safer and more attractive streets.”

Eleven grants were awarded to the following projects:

Bridlemile Walkway $3,368

This project will transform a walkway in the Bridlemile neighborhood of SW Portland. The walkway is used by neighbors to access area schools, bus stops and grocery stores and is a part of the SW Trails network.

“Dia de las Niñas y los Niños” Parade and Celebration $3,625

This community event is hosted annually by the Rigler Elementary School PTA to celebrate the Latin American holiday. This year’s event will include a Safe Routes to School theme and promote active transportation options for students and families in the Cully neighborhood.

Heritage Tree Trail $1,200

The University of Portland Neighborhood Association will use this project to promote the use of urban trails and neighborhood greenways, while also increasing awareness of the heritage trees network in their North Portland community.

Lents Green Ring Wayfinding Project $16,000

Green Lents and NAYA Generations, along with other community partners, will utilize these resources to engage community members on the development of a “Green Ring” in Southeast Portland. The “Green Ring” will promote active transportation, incorporate placemaking infrastructure and address safety concerns that have been a barrier to pedestrians and cyclists.

Living Cully Community Wayfinding Project $16,000

This project, led by Verde and Living Cully community partners, will complete a bilingual wayfinding system that will encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to six green spaces in the Cully community, including Thomas Cully Park scheduled to open in 2018.

NE 85th Street Community Greenspace and Intersection Repair $3,675

Neighbors in the Beech Milton community (near Madison High School) will utilize these funds to address pedestrian safety concerns and revive two intersection paintings, with a special focus on engaging diverse community members and local schools.

Painted Curb in Sullivan’s Gulch $8,550

This project seeks to address pedestrian safety concerns at the intersection of NE 21st Avenue and NE Clackamas Street. The rapidly growing Sullivan’s Gulch community has identified this as a problematic area for pedestrians seeking to access neighborhood grocery stores and transit.

Rosewood Center Parklet $9,785

The Rosewood Initiative will utilize these resources to facilitate the development of community identity markers and wayfinding signage that promotes the use of neighborhood greenways, highlights community spaces, and directs pedestrians to transit stops in Outer East Portland.

Safety Corridor for Deaf Children $16,000

Tucker Maxon School for the deaf will utilize these resources to address safety concerns near their school at SE Holgate and SE 28th. Their project vision includes speed bumps, maintenance of a gravel road and artistic placemaking.

ULPDX Williams Ave & Russell St Project $16,000

Led by the Urban League of Portland, and in partnership with Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative, this project will facilitate community beautification with the implementation of creative placemaking that celebrates the rich history of this intersection and community.

Urban Trails Maintenance and Construction in Southwest $5,500

SW Trails PDX will utilize these funds to improve community connectivity with an urban trail maintenance project of steps on SW Trail #1 from SW Twombly Ave to SW Melville Ave.

The Portland in the Streets Community Grant applications were due August 31, 2017. During the application period, eighty-two community members attended three informational workshops that provided more information and made staff available for technical questions. With the support of consults from Design + Culture Lab, there was also an intentional effort to solicit ideas from communities that have historically been underserved by City services and programming. Applications were scored for (1) project feasibility; (2) community partnerships and equity; (3) transportation and safety benefit; and (4) livability and community placemaking.

The selected projects will be supported by teams of PBOT staff across the bureau who will provide technical assistance informed by the priorities of the Livable Streets Strategy and Vision Zero, as well as other areas of PBOT work. PBOT will seek City Council authorization to continue the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program in future years. The timeline for year two of the program has not yet been determined.

Project progress can be tracked on PBOT’s website and Facebook page.

Residential Speed Limit Reduction Proposal

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

Portland City Council will consider a proposal on January 17, 2018, to reduce the speed limit on all residential streets to 20 miles per hour. If the ordinance passes, the Portland Bureau of Transportation will begin updating speed limit signs in February and expects to complete the process by April 1, 2018.

Residential streets make up around 70 percent of Portland’s street network and a large proportion of the city’s total public space. Reducing residential speeds is part of a broader citywide effort to support safe driving speeds on many types of streets.

20 mph speed limit would support safety

Most residential streets in Portland are narrow, have few marked crosswalks, and no bike lanes; given the tight space and lack of protection for people walking, using mobility devices, and biking, it is important that people drive slowly on residential streets.

The proposed 20 mph speed limit is part of Portland’s Vision Zero work to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. Slower driving speeds help prevent crashes and, when crashes occur, reduce the harm that results. A pedestrian hit by a driver at 25 mph is nearly twice as likely to die compared to someone hit at 20 mph (AAA, 2011/2013, Impact Speed and a Pedestrian’s Risk of Severe Injury or Death).

Sign installation would start in February

If Portland City Council approves the new residential speed limit, PBOT will adjust speed limit signage beginning in February 2018 and continue through March. PBOT would double the number of residential speed limit signs, installing approximately 2,000 across the city. At some locations, existing signs would be relocated to maximize their effectiveness.

As is the case today, not every residential street would have a speed limit sign, but the 20 mph speed limit would be in effect on all residential streets.

More information: