White Ally Toolkit at SEUL

From Southeast Uplift:

How-does-a-white-person-who-aspires-to-be-an-ally-against-racism-talk-to-their-friends-and-family-who-are-in-denial-about-racism-against-people-of-color_-768x644.png

There is increasing scientific evidence that shows that empathy-based dialogues are the way to go if you want to have a chance to change adults’ minds. According to this research, the best way to foster “debiasing” is to first listen empathetically to skeptics so they feel heard, and after that, raise experiences and facts that invite them to a broader and more nuanced perspective.

But you don’t have to simply take this on faith. Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were hardened after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  2. Have you ever observed situations where someone’s views were authentically changed for the better after they experienced a private lecture from someone who thought they knew “the truth”?
  3. Have ever been times when you someone listened to you empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped expand your view of a situation?
  4. Have been times when you listened to someone closely and empathetically (not necessarily about race) and this experience helped someone else expand their view of a situation?

If anti-racism allies are going to change any minds, empathetic listening will likely be important. But, the anti-racism movement should not expect POCs to empathetically listen to white racism skeptics. White people are in a much better position to execute listening-based strategy with people who are skeptical about whether racism is real.

On a daily basis, POCs must endure the indirect expression of white skepticism that racism really matters, and they must do so as they are they are experiencing overt and subtle racism in many parts of their lives. Some people of color might want to choose to have conversations where white people’s racial skepticism is consciously expressed. But it would not be fair to expect people of color to endure this.

This is a workshop for anyone in the who believes racism still exists and has questioned how to approach the topic of race with other white people in their communities. For more info, check out this website: https://www.whiteallytoolkit.com/

RSVP REQUIRED

If you are unable to pay the $10 cost for the training please contact Muz, muz@seuplift.org, (503) 232-0010 ext 319, for information on how to obtain a scholarship to cover the cost of attending the training.

*Contact Muz at muz@seuplift.org or call (503)232-0010 ext 319 if you require special accommodations.

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SPARC Community Kickoff Event

WHEN: Monday, March 19, 2018, 5:30 to 7:30PM
WHERE: Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark, Portland, OR

Come to Revolution Hall from 5:30 to 7:30 PMon March 19 to kick off of a community-led initiative designed to explore and address racism as a driver of homelessness, and disparities among homelessness, in Multnomah County.

The initiative is named SPARC (Supporting Partnerships for Anti-Racist Communities), and it’s coming to Multnomah County this year to build on research into roots and best practices already under way in 10 other communities. SPARC is an initiative of the Center for Social Innovation (C4).

The March 19 gathering is part of a week of events for community members, service providers and other key partners. The kickoff event will include light refreshments and a panel discussion featuring local leaders and service providers. SPARC will then spend the year working closely with community members and partners in A Home for Everyone, our community’s nearly four-year-old effort to address homelessness.

RSVP for the free event to reserve your spot at sparcportland.eventbrite.com

Aging and People with Disabilities 2018 Legislative Stakeholders Teleconference Call

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement:

ODHS Aging & People with Disabilities 2018 Legislative Stakeholders Teleconference Calls start February 7th, 2018

The Oregon Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) Director’s office has announced it will once again be holding Legislative Conference Calls during the 2018 State Legislative Session. The meetings are telephonic only and can be accessed at 1-877-336-1829. The participant code to enter is 8307334#.

The dates and times of the conference calls will be:

  • Wednesday, February 7th, from Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, February 21st, from Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, March 7th, from Noon to 1 p.m.

It is hoped that those interested in following the legislative issues regarding aging Oregonians and Oregonians with disabilities will be able to participate. More information about services for seniors and people with disabilities may go to the Oregon Department of Human Services website.

Dis/Representation/s October event: Immigrants and Refugees with Disabilities

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement: 

Immigrants and Refugees with Disabilities to be topic for November 30th Dis/Representation event

Where: PCC’s Cascade Campus Cascade Hall, Room 209, 705 North Killingsworth Street
When: Thursday, November 30 2017, 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM

Dis/Representation’s “Evolving Disability Discussions” November 30th event will focus on Immigrants and Refugees with Disabilities from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Saara Hirsi and Abdi Mohamed will lead the November discussion. They will address systemic issues of Isolation, Employment, and Education faced by refugees with disabilities. The event is free and open to the public.

The event is at Portland Community College’s Cascade Campus’ Cascade Hall, Room 209, 705 North Killingsworth Street. Accommodations available upon request are: ASL Interpreters, Audio Description, Real-Time Captioning (CART), and Alternate Formats. For accommodation requests, please contact one week in advance to ensure they will be available at disabilityartculture@gmail.com.

For accommodations, transit and parking info, online participation, discussion materials and more, visit http://www. dacphome.org/programs/disrepresentation, or contact the Disability Art and Culture Project at disabilityartculture@gmail.com.

Please note that PCC visitors parking a vehicle are required to purchase and display a permit. Parking costs $2 for two hours. When attending PCC events, please refrain from parking on neighborhood streets.

Dis/Representation is made possible through a grant from the Multnomah County Cultural Coalition and the Oregon Cultural Trust, and our partnership with Portland Community College Disability Services.

Portland Housing Bureau 2017 Racial Equity Forum

2017 Racial Equity Forum – Portland Housing Bureau
New Song Community Center, 220 NE Russell Street, Portland, OR 97212
Tuesday, September 12 2017, 8:30AM-11:30AM

Learn about the Portland Housing Bureau’s efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects.

Featuring Special Guest, Derek Hyra, Author of “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City”

Click here to RSVP

The Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) invites you to join us on September 12, 2017 for our Annual Racial Equity Forum to learn about our efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects. This year’s program will include a review of PHB policies and the impact they have had on the diversity within PHB’s housing portfolio, as well as a keynote address from special guest speaker Derek Hyra, Associate Professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University. Professor Hyra’s research focuses on processes of neighborhood change, with an emphasis on housing, metropolitan politics, and race. He is the author of Race, Class and Politics in the Cappuccino City.

If you have any questions about this event or need to request an accommodation, contact Kim McCarty at 503-823-5312.