Paving Project on SE 50th Avenue

PBOT News Release:

SE 50th Avenue Paving Project kicks off 2018 Fixing Our Streets construction season.  PBOT to invest a total of $105 million in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation broke ground today on the SE 50th Avenue Paving Project, the first Fixing Our Streetsproject of the 2018 construction season. The first of 19 projects breaking ground between March and August, the $1.1 million project will pave the street from SE Hawthorne to SE Division and update street corners with ADA ramps to prevent further pavement deterioration and improve overall street accessibility. Work on SE 50th Avenue will require intermittent lane and sidewalk closures as workers begin curb ramp construction on the 26 street corners slated for ADA curb ramp upgrades through late May, before requiring additional lane closures and detours for paving work in June. The project will be completed in late June.

The 19 projects going to construction this spring and summer range from a $200,000 Neighborhood Greenway on SW/NW 20th to a $3.5 million paving project on SW Vermont Street from SW Oleson Road to SW Capitol Highway. In total, approximately $20 million in Fixing Our Streets projects will begin construction in the next six months.

Construction will impact neighborhoods across the city, with projects taking place in all five quadrants of the city. Among them:

East Portland:

North Portland:

NE Portland:

SE Portland:

NW Portland:

SW Portland:

In addition, PBOT’s maintenance bureau workers continue their ongoing, Fixing Our Streets funded work of guard rail replacement and base repair street replacement. Fixing Our Streets projects make up approximately 20 percent of the investments in Portland’s transportation infrastructure this construction season, with a total of approximately $105 million being invested in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Fixing Our Streets program, paid for by a local gas tax approved by Portland voters in May 2016 and a heavy vehicle use tax, is Portland’s first street repair and traffic safety program financed with local funding. 56 percent of Fixing Our Streets funding is invested in street maintenance and 44 percent is invested in safety improvements. The City Council ordinance included a project list that shows specific projects that are intended to be funded. The list of projects can be found at www.fixingourstreets.com.

About the Fixing Our Streets Program

The Fixing Our Streets program is the result of the passage of Measure 26-173, a 10-cent tax on motor vehicle fuels and Portland’s first local funding source dedicated to street repair and traffic safety projects. Passed on May 17, 2016, Measure 26-173 will raise an estimated $64 million over four years. PBOT will invest this money in a wide variety of street improvement and safety projects across the entire city. Fixing Our Streets will help PBOT expand preventive street maintenance that saves money and prevents potholes. It will support our work to make it safer for children to walk to school. It will allow us to build more sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights and bike lanes. The Portland City Council also unanimously passed a Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, for vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, which will also fund the Fixing Our Streets program.

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Still Time to Comment on Residential Infill Project Amendments

From City of Portland:

Since the release of the Residential Infill Project Discussion Draft, dozens of community members have attended the kick-off meeting, one of the five drop-in office hours or any of the various meetings staff have been attending since the proposals were published on Oct. 3, 2017. This outreach period is focused on familiarizing community members with the detailed amendments in preparation for the Planning and Sustainability Commission and City Council hearings next year.  NEW DEADLINE: November 30th, 2017For more information on how to view the documents and comment, CLICK HERE.

City Seeks Proposals for Portland’s Housing Bond

The Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) released a Request for Interest (RFI) on October 23, 2017, seeking opportunities to acquire land or existing residential buildings of twenty units or more.

Portland voters approved Portland’s Housing Bond in 2016, authorizing the City to issue up to $258.4 million in general obligation bonds for the development or acquisition of affordable housing. PHB expects to build and purchase a minimum of 1,300 housing units with these funds.  Property owners, their representatives, and developers may now begin submitting proposals for Portland’s Housing Bond.

Read the full article on Portland’s website.

ONI’s 2017 Legislative Advocacy 101 Panel

Learn to be effective in advocating for your community at ONI’s 2017 Legislative Advocacy 101 Panel event!

Hear from government officials and advocates how to be an effective community advocate during next year’s Oregon state legislative session at ONI’s 2017 Legislative Advocacy 101 Panel event on Monday, October 30. The event will be in the Immigrant & Refugee Community Organization’s (IRCO) community center at 10301 N.E. Glisan Street from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

City Commissioners Chloe Eudaly and Amanda Fritz will conduct a legislative community forum 7:25 to 8:30 p.m. to gather attendee’s input for the City’s state legislative agenda. They are seeking input on community issues and which issues people would like to see advanced by the legislature. There will be a group exercise to identify community and neighborhood priorities.

The first section of this event will have an advocacy panel of elected officials and professional advocates sharing advice and answering questions about how the community can make an impact on public policy at the state level. The panel consists of Representative Janelle Bynum (House District 51), Mary Moller from Governor Kate Brown’s office, OPAL’s Deputy Director Vivian Satterfield, and Senator Elizabeth Steiner Hayward (Senate District 17). The panel will be moderated by Elizabeth Edwards from the City’s Office of Government Relations.

ASL Interpretation will be provided at this event. The City of Portland will make reasonable accommodation for people with disabilities and people needing assistance with language interpretation and translation. Please contact by phone at 503-823-3093 or email marco.mejia@portlandoregon.gov by Monday, October 23rd to request accommodation.

TriMet transportation is possible by taking the #15 Belmont/NW 23rd and the #25 Glisan/Rockwood bus lines. The MAX Blue line stop at N.E. 102nd Avenue and Burnside is a few blocks from the IRCO community center.

Portland Housing Bureau 2017 Racial Equity Forum

2017 Racial Equity Forum – Portland Housing Bureau
New Song Community Center, 220 NE Russell Street, Portland, OR 97212
Tuesday, September 12 2017, 8:30AM-11:30AM

Learn about the Portland Housing Bureau’s efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects.

Featuring Special Guest, Derek Hyra, Author of “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City”

Click here to RSVP

The Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) invites you to join us on September 12, 2017 for our Annual Racial Equity Forum to learn about our efforts to eliminate race-based disparities in housing programs and projects. This year’s program will include a review of PHB policies and the impact they have had on the diversity within PHB’s housing portfolio, as well as a keynote address from special guest speaker Derek Hyra, Associate Professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University. Professor Hyra’s research focuses on processes of neighborhood change, with an emphasis on housing, metropolitan politics, and race. He is the author of Race, Class and Politics in the Cappuccino City.

If you have any questions about this event or need to request an accommodation, contact Kim McCarty at 503-823-5312.