Amplify Black Neighbors: Art Week 3

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 3 Featured Artist: Carrie Mae Weems

Photo of NYT Greats image of Carrie
Photo of Carrie Mae Weems from  The New York Times Style Magazine Greats, 2018

Partial Bio from Carrie Mae Weems’ website: Considered one of the most influential contemporary American artists, Carrie Mae Weems has investigated family relationships, cultural identity, sexism, class, political systems, and the consequences of power. Determined as ever to enter the picture—both literally and metaphorically—Weems has sustained an on-going dialogue within contemporary discourse for over thirty years. During this time, Carrie Mae Weems has developed a complex body of art employing photographs, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation, and video.

Click here to read her full biography.

Cover of Carrie Mae Weems Kitchen Table Series book
Image is of one of three in Carrie Mae Weems: Kitchen Table Series, Published by Damiani/Matsumoto Editions.

Amplify Black Neighbors: Support Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2: Cartlandia‘s three Black-owned Food Carts – Catfish Lane, Manna, and Nacheaux

Collage made with images from Cartlandia.com
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Amplify Black Neighbors: Juneteenth

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

BDNA Note: In lieu of our normal Thursday post, we are featuring information about Juneteenth, a sacred day for African Americans around the country. We encourage neighborhood allies to avoid cultural appropriation and instead support our Black community by donating, educating ourselves, and continuing to work towards a better future together.

Juneteenth
Juneteenth image from the Mosaic Templars Center

Partial History of Juneteenth from juneteenth.com:

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

On January 1, 1980, Juneteenth became an official state holiday in Texas through the efforts of Al Edwards, an African American state legislator. The successful passage of this bill marked Juneteenth as the first emancipation celebration granted official state recognition.  Edwards has since actively sought to spread the observance of Juneteenth all across America.

Click here to read the full history on Juneteenth.com

juneteenth flag
Image of the Juneteenth flag from Wikimedia Commons

Amplify Black Neighbors: Act Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2 Featured Action: Justice For Breonna Taylor

F.B.I. to Investigate Shooting of Breonna Taylor by Louisville ...
Image of Breonna Taylor from the New York Times.

Information from JusticeforBreonna.org:

Breonna should be alive.

On the night of March 13th, the Louisville Metro Police executed a warrant, looking for drugs they never found, reportedly trafficked by a person who did not live with Breonna or in her complex-and whom they already had in custody.

They sprayed her home with 20 rounds, shooting Breonna 8 times, killing her in her bed.

L.A. woman is raising awareness for Breonna Taylor's death - Los ...
Graphic of Breonna Taylor from the LA Times

Breonna deserves accountability.

Neither the Louisville Metro Police nor Mayor Greg Fischer have given her mother any answers. “Not one person has talked to me. Not one person has explained anything to me,” Tamika Palmer, Taylor’s mother, said in an interview. “I want justice for her. I want them to say her name. There’s no reason Breonna should be dead at all.”

Click here to read more and learn how you can take action.

Amplify Black Neighbors: Watch Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2 Featured Film: Just Mercy

Image may contain: 3 people, text
Image from Just Mercy Film’s Facebook page.

Partial Description from JustMercyFilm.com: “Just Mercy” is based on the powerful and thought-provoking true story of young lawyer Bryan Stevenson (Jordan) and his history-making battle for justice. After graduating from Harvard, Bryan had his pick of lucrative jobs. Instead, he heads to Alabama to defend those wrongly condemned or who were not afforded proper representation, with the support of local advocate Eva Ansley (Larson). One of his first, and most incendiary, cases is that of Walter McMillian (Foxx), who, in 1987, was sentenced to die for the notorious murder of an 18-year-old girl, despite a preponderance of evidence proving his innocence and the fact that the main testimony against him came from a criminal with a motive to lie. In the years that follow, Bryan becomes embroiled in a labyrinth of legal and political maneuverings, as well as overt and unabashed racism as he fights for Walter, and others like him, with the odds—and the system—stacked against them.

(Click here to read the full synopsis.)

Note from BDNA: Just Mercy is available free through June via the official site, or on your favorite streaming service.

Amplify Black Neighbors: Listen Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2 Featured Audio: Code Switch: a podcast by NPR

NPR Code Switch 2020
Image from NPR’s Code Switch podcast

Description from NPR: What’s CODE SWITCH? It’s the fearless conversations about race that you’ve been waiting for! Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between. This podcast makes ALL OF US part of the conversation — because we’re all part of the story.

Amplify Black Neighbors: Read Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2 Featured Author: Leah Penniman

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Image of author Leah Penniman from farmingwhileblack.org

Bio from FarmingWhileBlack.org: Leah Penniman is a Black Kreyol educator, farmer/peyizan, author, and food justice activist from Soul Fire Farm in Grafton, NY. She co-founded Soul Fire Farm in 2011 with the mission to end racism in the food system and reclaim our ancestral connection to land. As co-Executive Director, Leah is part of a team that facilitates powerful food sovereignty programs – including farmer trainings for Black & Brown people, a subsidized farm food distribution program for people living under food apartheid, and domestic and international organizing toward equity in the food system. Leah holds an MA in Science Education and BA in Environmental Science and International Development from Clark University, and is a Manye (Queen Mother) in Vodun. Leah has been farming since 1996 and teaching since 2002. The work of Leah and Soul Fire Farm has been recognized by the Soros Racial Justice Fellowship, Fulbright Program, Omega Sustainability Leadership Award, Presidential Award for Science Teaching, NYS Health Emerging Innovator Awards, and Andrew Goodman Foundation, among others.

Her book, Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation is available at Multnomah County Library or for purchase on her website.

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Image of the book cover for Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm’s Practical Guide to Liberation by Leah Penniman from farmingwhileblack.org

Amplify Black Neighbors: Art Week 2

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 2 Featured Artist: Cee Blanco (Cee White)

Image may contain: 1 person

About: Cee White AKA Cee Blanco AKA whitechocolatedisco, is a House music artist whose medium is records, turntables, and tape decks. Cee Blanco has collaborated with the “Renegade Rhythms” crew, Tom Mitchell AKA Dlyte, and the Legendary Doc Martin from Sublevel Recordings. You can enjoy his music on MixCloud and TwitchTV, as well as live shows around the Pacific NW (when they’re permitted again).

Amplify Black Neighbors: Support Week 1

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Image description: a screen shot of featured Black businesses in June 2020 from blackpdx.com

Week 1: BlackPDX.com

Mission from BlackPDX.com: BlackPDX.com is a virtual community hub created to amplify the VOICES and MESSAGE of the black community in the greater Portland metro area, ultimately to improve economic conditions for black families. We provide assistance to business owners, non-profits, creatives and other organizations to increase their REACH and provide unique and needed opportunities for community connection.

Amplify Black Neighbors: Donate Week 1

This post is part of Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association‘s Amplify Black Neighbors post series happening throughout June 2020. For more information, click here.

Week 1 Featured Organization: Black Futures Farm

Photo taken by Chelsea Powers of community members working the Black Futures Farm site in Brentwood-Darlington, April 2020.

Description from Black Futures Farm website: Black Futures Farm is a community farm, staffed by volunteers and two resident farmers. We sit on 1.15 acres with 17 different fruit trees, vegetables, flowers, medicinal and cooking herbs. Our farm is located on the grounds of the Learning Gardens Lab at 60th and SE Duke in Portland, Oregon.

We are a group of Black identified/ Diasporic and Continental African people working together, growing food and community. Our aim is to implement the best methods of growing food, taking the best of what we can from our ancestral practices while being a part of innovation.

Black Futures Farm is a project of the Black Food Sovereignty Coalition, which is a nonprofit fiscally sponsored by Know Agenda Foundation. Please contact us at blackfuturesfarm@gmail.com to request EIN numbers.

BDNA Note: Black Futures Farm’s 2020 CSA is full, but you can support them by donating via PayPal! You can also follow them on Facebook.