PBOT Announces Community Grant Projects

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

PBOT announces $100,000 in community projects to fund safety, placemaking, innovation and equity

The Portland Bureau of Transportation is proud to announce the eleven projects that have been selected for the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program. The program was established to support community-driven projects focused on transportation safety, equity, innovation and placemaking. Portlanders were especially encouraged to submit proposals for transportation safety projects in support of Vision Zero, creative community infrastructure projects, events in city streets, urban trail projects and initiatives that support innovative community engagement.

Sixty-three applications were submitted by Portland community and neighborhood groups requesting a total of $736,954. A total of $100,000 was available.

“As these projects clearly show, our communities are overflowing with creative ideas about how to improve their neighborhoods. We are very excited to be partnering on these projects, and we are already learning so much from the thoughtful and innovative ideas that Portlanders brought forward,” said Transportation Director Leah Treat. “I am gratified that we are able to help these communities realize their visions for safer and more attractive streets.”

Eleven grants were awarded to the following projects:

Bridlemile Walkway $3,368

This project will transform a walkway in the Bridlemile neighborhood of SW Portland. The walkway is used by neighbors to access area schools, bus stops and grocery stores and is a part of the SW Trails network.

“Dia de las Niñas y los Niños” Parade and Celebration $3,625

This community event is hosted annually by the Rigler Elementary School PTA to celebrate the Latin American holiday. This year’s event will include a Safe Routes to School theme and promote active transportation options for students and families in the Cully neighborhood.

Heritage Tree Trail $1,200

The University of Portland Neighborhood Association will use this project to promote the use of urban trails and neighborhood greenways, while also increasing awareness of the heritage trees network in their North Portland community.

Lents Green Ring Wayfinding Project $16,000

Green Lents and NAYA Generations, along with other community partners, will utilize these resources to engage community members on the development of a “Green Ring” in Southeast Portland. The “Green Ring” will promote active transportation, incorporate placemaking infrastructure and address safety concerns that have been a barrier to pedestrians and cyclists.

Living Cully Community Wayfinding Project $16,000

This project, led by Verde and Living Cully community partners, will complete a bilingual wayfinding system that will encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to six green spaces in the Cully community, including Thomas Cully Park scheduled to open in 2018.

NE 85th Street Community Greenspace and Intersection Repair $3,675

Neighbors in the Beech Milton community (near Madison High School) will utilize these funds to address pedestrian safety concerns and revive two intersection paintings, with a special focus on engaging diverse community members and local schools.

Painted Curb in Sullivan’s Gulch $8,550

This project seeks to address pedestrian safety concerns at the intersection of NE 21st Avenue and NE Clackamas Street. The rapidly growing Sullivan’s Gulch community has identified this as a problematic area for pedestrians seeking to access neighborhood grocery stores and transit.

Rosewood Center Parklet $9,785

The Rosewood Initiative will utilize these resources to facilitate the development of community identity markers and wayfinding signage that promotes the use of neighborhood greenways, highlights community spaces, and directs pedestrians to transit stops in Outer East Portland.

Safety Corridor for Deaf Children $16,000

Tucker Maxon School for the deaf will utilize these resources to address safety concerns near their school at SE Holgate and SE 28th. Their project vision includes speed bumps, maintenance of a gravel road and artistic placemaking.

ULPDX Williams Ave & Russell St Project $16,000

Led by the Urban League of Portland, and in partnership with Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative, this project will facilitate community beautification with the implementation of creative placemaking that celebrates the rich history of this intersection and community.

Urban Trails Maintenance and Construction in Southwest $5,500

SW Trails PDX will utilize these funds to improve community connectivity with an urban trail maintenance project of steps on SW Trail #1 from SW Twombly Ave to SW Melville Ave.

The Portland in the Streets Community Grant applications were due August 31, 2017. During the application period, eighty-two community members attended three informational workshops that provided more information and made staff available for technical questions. With the support of consults from Design + Culture Lab, there was also an intentional effort to solicit ideas from communities that have historically been underserved by City services and programming. Applications were scored for (1) project feasibility; (2) community partnerships and equity; (3) transportation and safety benefit; and (4) livability and community placemaking.

The selected projects will be supported by teams of PBOT staff across the bureau who will provide technical assistance informed by the priorities of the Livable Streets Strategy and Vision Zero, as well as other areas of PBOT work. PBOT will seek City Council authorization to continue the Portland in the Streets Community Grant Program in future years. The timeline for year two of the program has not yet been determined.

Project progress can be tracked on PBOT’s website and Facebook page.

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Oregon Transportation Commission Recruits for New Advisory Committee

From Office of Neighborhood Involvement:

Oregon Transportation Commission invites Oregonians to apply for newly formed advisory committee

New committee is part of transportation funding package, HB 2017

SALEM – The Oregon Transportation Commission is seeking Oregonians interested in volunteering for the new Continuous Improvement Advisory Committee. This important committee was created by the Oregon Legislature in the recent transportation funding bill, HB 2017. The committee will advise the commission on how to improve the Oregon Department of Transportation by recommending ways to make the agency more efficient, recommending measures to gauge the agency’s performance, and addressing audits.

“The Continuous Improvement Advisory Committee will be a valuable resource to the Oregon Transportation Commission in helping ODOT become more efficient and ensuring the agency is performing well,” said Commission Chair Tammy Baney, who will chair the committee. “The committee’s work will ensure that recent transportation investments made by the legislature and Oregon’s taxpayers are spent effectively.”

Information on the committee is available on ODOT’s website (http://www.oregon.gov/odot/get-involved/Pages/continuous-improvement-committee.aspx.) The website includes:

Applications are due by midnight on Monday, February 19. ODOT staff is available to answer questions and can be reached at CIACadmin@odot.state.or.us.

For more information: Shelley M. Snow, shelley.m.snow@odot.state.or.us, 503-881-5362

EPIC Meeting – Traffic Division

Join EPIC for their bi-monthly meeting!

Wednesday January 24, 2018 at 6:00PM
East Precinct Community Room (727 SE 106th Ave, 97216)

Keynote Presentation: PPB Traffic Division

Most of us drive to get to where we want to go. Usually we feel safe on the road, but who do we expect to help us when something goes wrong?  Who investigates serious vehicular injuries and fatal collisions?  Who enforces DUII laws and major traffic crimes?  Who provides traffic control for parades, demonstrations and motorcades?

Captain Mike Crebs will address these and other questions about the Portland Police Bureau’s Traffic Division on Wednesday January 24th.

Other agenda items:

Vision for East Precinct
Name Recognition Interaction

Please bring a friend or neighbor.  This is a meeting that you won’t want to miss! For more information, contact Dave Smith at Dave.Smith@portlandoregon.gov.

Review and comment on the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft

News from the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

Draft Off-road Cycling Master Plan includes recommendations for trials and bike parks for people of all ages and abilities.
Learn more online or at upcoming open houses; then submit your comments by Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017.
Portland, ORE. — With the help of a project advisory committee, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability has released the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft for public review and comment.
The Off-road Cycling Master Plan blends a citywide vision with a practical and realistic approach to increasing the opportunity for off-road cycling across Portland. The master plan recommends locations for three different types of bike facilities:
Take a “ride” through the online open house to learn more about the recommendations for off-road cycling trails and bike parks throughout the city.
Community members can comment in the following ways:
Project staff will consider public comments before they forward final recommendations to City Council in 2018. The comment period for the Off-Road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft ends atmidnight on Sunday, December 31, 2017.
Four open houses throughout the city
Learn more about the proposals, talk to staff and submit comments at one of the community events.
Thursday, November 30, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Charles Jordan Community Center
9009 N Foss Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #4
Monday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Southwest Community Center
6820 SW 45th Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #1
Thursday, December 7, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
East Portland Community Center
740 SE 106th Avenue
TriMet Bus Routes #15, 20
Wednesday, December 13, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Matt Dishman Community Center
77 NE Knott Street
TriMet Bus Routes #4, 6, 24, 44
Background
The project team combined community input from thousands of Portlanders with feedback from City property managers and the Project Advisory Committee to develop the Discussion Draft of the Off-road Cycling Master Plan. The Discussion Draft also draws on best practices, additional planning and visits to more complicated properties by environmental and off-road cycling specialists.
The Discussion Draft aims to support equity by bringing off-road cycling trails and bike parks to neighborhoods that have traditionally not had access to these types of places. The goal is to create more places to ride that are easy to get to from all neighborhoods by bike or transit.
The Discussion Draft also includes recommendations to ensure people of all ages, skill levels, and incomes can take part in off-road cycling. The recommendations also incorporate best practices on how to design facilities to create safe and sustainable trails. The result is a map of recommended sites for new trails and bicycle parks as well as many recommendations for how to create a safe, sustainable and successful system.
For more information, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/offroadcycling

Rep. Taylor, BDNA Chair McKinley, Meesa Long testify at Metro Council for Safe Routes to Schools

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Brentwood-Darlington is in fierce competition for Regional Flexible Funding dollars for Safe Routes to Schools that would infill sidewalks from 52nd to 82nd on Duke and Flavel St. that lead to our three Title 1 schools serving 1,500 diverse, low income students as well as the Green Thumb Transitional School that serves students with disabilities.  This would also create a Greenway on Ogden and Knapp, including much needed traffic calming, crosswalk creation and infrastructure in underfunded Brentwood-Darlington, home to 13,000 Portland residents.  $3 million dollars would come from RFF funding with a matching $3 million from PBOT.

The sidewalks on Duke and Flavel are patchy, incomplete, and 8 months out the year, under water, forcing children, residents with mobility issues, and parents pushing strollers into the bike lane with oncoming traffic.  TriMet users stand in the street or ankle deep puddles to wait for the bus on the only two major transportation lines in Brentwood-Darlington.  Ogden and Knapp is another major pedestrian avenue for BD with no sidewalk from 52nd to 82nd, no safe crosswalks on 72nd or 82nd.  If it became a greenway it would be the first of it’s kind in this area, connecting to the Springwater Corridor and to major points in Lents.  Funding of both projects would improve the walkshed and bikeshed to new Lents town center and provide more pedestrian friendly paths in car dependent Brentwood-Darlington.  There is currently only one grocery store in all of BD and it is located on Flavel.

Representative Kathleen Taylor, BDNA Chair Lesley McKinley, Vice Chair Chelsea Powers, BDNA board member and project champion Meesa Long, and Lane Vice Principal Mike Rowell all testifed at Metro Council last night along with many Brentwood-Darlington residents.  They presented both written and oral testimony, visuals of the stark inequality in Brentwood-Darlington, and highlighted the extreme need in BD.

Currently, Woodmere, Whitman, Lane and the Green Thumb are activating their students and parents as well as teachers and admin support to lobby for these much needed improvements.

Public comment and input will weigh heavy in this process and your support is needed.  Here are ways to reach out to Metro and be involved in the process:

Share comment by phone 503-797-1750 or TDD 503-797-1804

Email transportation@oregonmetro.gov

Letter to Metro Planning, 600 NE Grand Ave., Portland, OR 97232

Comment on map http://www.oregonmetro.gov/public-projects/regional-flexible-funding-transportation-projects