Errol Heights Park Preliminary Plans

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Below are the preliminary plans, as presented to the Errol Heights Park Citizen Advisory Committee.  Want to know more or ask about these plans?  Come to the BDNA All-Committees meeting on Tuesday, August 21, 7:00-9:00PM, at the Brentwood-Darlington Community Center (7211 SE 62nd Ave, 97206) and talk to the Portland Parks and Recreation project staff in person!  Portland Bureau of Transportation will also be present to discuss how their Errol Heights projects affect the park.

Click here to take the neighbor generated survey regarding Errol Heights Park before August 19th!

Option 1 ACTIVE - PAC 3

Option 1 – Passive

Option 2 Passive PAC 3

Option 2 – Active

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Errol Heights LID Receives Neighborhood Support

From Portland Bureau of Transportation: 

EHLIDGraph

Throughout the month of May, PBOT collected petitions of support for the Errol Heights LID, held meetings in the neighborhood with property owners, and answered a variety of questions and concerns about proposed changes in the neighborhood.

Errol Heights property owners have turned in 57 petitions supporting the LID. Waivered properties plus non-waivered supporters reached 62% (properties with waivers of remonstrance are counted as automatic supporters of the LID). Even if we didn’t count waivered properties as automatic yes votes, the LID still received close to 50% support (currently at about 48%).

While this level of support sends a strong signal to City Council that the neighborhood is behind the project, more petitions are always better. It’s not too late for your support to be counted. Petitions can still be mailed in using the prepaid envelope from the packet. Contact us if you need any help.

The date for the LID Formation Hearing at City Council is still pending but will likely occur in August or September. We plan on sending a followup email in July with more information.

What’s next? Click the graphic below for a step by step guide to the LID process.

EHLIDNext

For more information contact: Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager or click here.

Errol Heights LID Petitions Due May 30

Reminder about the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project

Petitions of support were mailed to all property owners within the LID boundary in April (see map below). Don’t forget to send yours in if you support the project to improve streets and stormwater infrastructure in Errol Heights. We will be posting results of the petition process in early June.

Need a new petition, or have questions about the project? Please email, call, or find us online:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

EH)LID

Note: Map is ONLY to show which properties are included in LID. It does not show future alignment of SE Tenino CT or other street reconfigurations.

“Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

From Portland Bureau of Transportation: 

PBOT, Multnomah County Library and Metro celebrate Bike Month by bringing back “Bike to Books” coloring contest and bike light giveaway

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and Multnomah County Library, with support from Metro, are celebrating Bike Month with “Bike to Books,” a program to encourage residents to ride their bicycle to their local library.

As part of the program, PBOT and Multnomah County Library are bringing back Portland’s “Bike to Books” Bike Month coloring contest. Students living in Multnomah County from Pre-Kindergarten to 12th Grade are invited to design bike lane art for installation in one of the City’s bike lanes. Portland’s bike lane art, found in bike lanes and on neighborhood greenways across the city, is well known nationwide. Designs are created by crew members on their own time using leftover materials that would otherwise go to waste. In 2017, in the first year of our Bike to Books program, PBOT crews installed four winning Bike to Books bike lane art designs near each winning artist’s neighborhood library branch.

It’s easy to enter, with a variety of great prizes. Young people in Portland and Multnomah County can submit their own designs using the bike symbol coloring page. The winning art will be installed on a bike lane this summer by one of PBOT’s striping crews. Second prize winners will each receive four full-day passes to ride your bicycle at the Lumberyard Bike Park (including rental bikes and safety equipment if needed) and third prize winners will win a bike helmet from Portland-based Nutcase Helmets. Coloring pages can be picked up at all Multnomah County Library branches (click here for locations) or downloaded online. Contestants must drop-off their entry at a library branch in person, to be entered into the contest. Full contest rules are available online.

In addition to the coloring contest, every person who bikes to a Multnomah County Library branch will receive a free bike light provided by Metro (while supplies last). Special Bike Storytimes for young readers are also being offered at numerous library branches across the county.

 “We want every Portlander to feel they have a voice in the way we design our city and the earlier we can get our residents involved the better,” PBOT Director Leah Treat said. “This student-designed bike lane art is, in many ways, the beginning of the conversation between PBOT and the young people of Portland who will use our roads, bikeways and sidewalks for decades to come. If they can design such creative art for our streets, imagine the other ideas they’ll bring to us in the future. We’re excited and we’re listening.”

“Libraries are about creating connections for people of all ages to learn and create,” said Multnomah County Library Director Vailey Oehlke. “With Bike to Books, we’re teaming up with important partners in PBOT and Metro to share the joy around reading, learning and biking with an eye toward safety and sustainability.”

Books and bikes are two pillars of Portland culture. One of the busiest public libraries in the United States, Multnomah County Library is beloved by the community it serves. In addition, Portland’s young readers bike to school in record numbers. Today, thanks to PBOT’s Safe Routes to School Program, 36.8 percent of trips to school in Portland are on foot or by bike – among the highest in the nation.

Portland Bike Month runs throughout the month of May with events happening across the city sponsored by multiple organizations to encourage people of all ages to get on their bike and enjoy the spring sunshine and hundreds of miles of bike lanes and neighborhood greenways in the city of Portland.

Information about Bike to Books and Bike Month events can be found at: www.biketobooks.com

LID Packets Hit Mailboxes Soon

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

LID Petition Packets Mailed Week of April 16th 

In the next week, expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by May 30, 2018

LID Informational Sessions at Errol Heights Park

Questions about the LID or your individual assessment? Meet with PBOT project team (and also have the chance to turn in your vote in person). All meetings will be in the park across from the Community Garden. Look for the white tent and drop in anytime during the hours below.

  • April 30, 7 AM – 9 AM
  • May 3, 5 PM – 7 PM
  • May 4, 11 AM – 1 PM

Unable to make any of the meeting times? Let us know and we can set up a phone call or in-person meeting at a separate time.

Next Steps and Timeline

May 30: Petitions due to PBOT. If over 50% of property owners in proposed LID support its formation, a City Council hearing date will be set.

June 27: Target City Council hearing date

  • 21 calendar days prior to council hearing: mailers will be sent out to each property owner with hearing and LID details
  • 14 calendar days prior to council hearing: two notices of intent to form LID published in a paper of general circulation in the City and two signs placed within the LID boundary
  • 7 calendar days prior to council hearing: remonstrances against LID formation due to City Auditor in writing (delivered in person or by first class U.S. mail to: 1221 SW 4th AVE. Room 310, Portland OR 97204)

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Project contact info:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

 David Backes, Capital Project Assistant: 503.823.5811

NOTE: Elizabeth will be out of the office April 6-24. David will be answering questions in her absence.

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

Paving Project on SE 50th Avenue

PBOT News Release:

SE 50th Avenue Paving Project kicks off 2018 Fixing Our Streets construction season.  PBOT to invest a total of $105 million in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation broke ground today on the SE 50th Avenue Paving Project, the first Fixing Our Streetsproject of the 2018 construction season. The first of 19 projects breaking ground between March and August, the $1.1 million project will pave the street from SE Hawthorne to SE Division and update street corners with ADA ramps to prevent further pavement deterioration and improve overall street accessibility. Work on SE 50th Avenue will require intermittent lane and sidewalk closures as workers begin curb ramp construction on the 26 street corners slated for ADA curb ramp upgrades through late May, before requiring additional lane closures and detours for paving work in June. The project will be completed in late June.

The 19 projects going to construction this spring and summer range from a $200,000 Neighborhood Greenway on SW/NW 20th to a $3.5 million paving project on SW Vermont Street from SW Oleson Road to SW Capitol Highway. In total, approximately $20 million in Fixing Our Streets projects will begin construction in the next six months.

Construction will impact neighborhoods across the city, with projects taking place in all five quadrants of the city. Among them:

East Portland:

North Portland:

NE Portland:

SE Portland:

NW Portland:

SW Portland:

In addition, PBOT’s maintenance bureau workers continue their ongoing, Fixing Our Streets funded work of guard rail replacement and base repair street replacement. Fixing Our Streets projects make up approximately 20 percent of the investments in Portland’s transportation infrastructure this construction season, with a total of approximately $105 million being invested in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Fixing Our Streets program, paid for by a local gas tax approved by Portland voters in May 2016 and a heavy vehicle use tax, is Portland’s first street repair and traffic safety program financed with local funding. 56 percent of Fixing Our Streets funding is invested in street maintenance and 44 percent is invested in safety improvements. The City Council ordinance included a project list that shows specific projects that are intended to be funded. The list of projects can be found at www.fixingourstreets.com.

About the Fixing Our Streets Program

The Fixing Our Streets program is the result of the passage of Measure 26-173, a 10-cent tax on motor vehicle fuels and Portland’s first local funding source dedicated to street repair and traffic safety projects. Passed on May 17, 2016, Measure 26-173 will raise an estimated $64 million over four years. PBOT will invest this money in a wide variety of street improvement and safety projects across the entire city. Fixing Our Streets will help PBOT expand preventive street maintenance that saves money and prevents potholes. It will support our work to make it safer for children to walk to school. It will allow us to build more sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights and bike lanes. The Portland City Council also unanimously passed a Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, for vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, which will also fund the Fixing Our Streets program.

Errol Heights Update and Next Steps

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

Thank you to everyone who completed the recent online survey regarding street design for the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project. Survey respondents strongly preferred the less expensive shared-street design (votes came in 3 to 1 for this treatment).

The shared street design applies to 48th, 49th, 51st, Tenino Drive, and Nehalem Street, while SE Tenino Court and SE Malden Drive both require sidewalk on one side (see map below for properties included in the LID).

With your feedback, we were able to go in to more detail on the design and have completed a cost estimate for the project.

It is now time for LID participants to submit petitions for the project.

In the next month, please expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Cost estimate details
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by April 30, 2018

LID Info sessions – 1st week of April:

The mailer will also include details of upcoming meetings where Errol Heights neighbors can come speak with PBOT staff about the LID process and ask questions about their individual LID assessments. The location and times are TBD but will be near the neighborhood, with morning, daytime, and evening sessions. These dates will also be posted on the project website.

For any questions in the meantime, please get in touch with us and keep an eye on the project website for the most up-to-date information.

Project contact info: Elizabeth Mahon

503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh