Bond Oversight Committee Meets February 1, 2018

From Portland Housing Bureau:

Thursday, February 1, 2018 from 6:30-8:30 PM

IRCO Community Room

10301 NE Glisan Street

Portland, OR 97220

Mayor Ted Wheeler will join the committee for February’s Meeting in East PortlandTopics for discussion include: (1) the draft Community Engagement Plan; and (2) new tenant screening criteria.

This event is free and refreshments will be served. Please click here to RSVP. Your RSVP helps us plan for food, materials, childcare, and other accomodations,  but it is not required to attend.

Bond Oversight Committee meetings are open to the public and public testimony is invited. Agendas and meeting materials will be posted online here.

For more information about Portland’s Housing Bond, visit us online at www.portlandhousingbond.com

Sign up here to recieve email notifications about upcoming meetings and related updates.

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Deadline for Written Testimony on the CC2035 Plan Extended

Deadline for written testimony on the CC2035 Plan extended to Monday, January 22 at noon.

January 18, 2018, the Portland City Council held a public hearing on their draft amendments to the Central City 2035 Plan. Roughly 70 people testified in person on these amendments to the new long-range plan.

At Commissioner Fritz’s suggestions, Council agreed to extend the deadline for written testimony – on the amendments only – until noon on Monday, January 22, 2018. Testifiers may submit their testimony by email or in person.

  • Email: cc2035@portlandoregon.gov
  • In person: Portland City Council c/o Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, 1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100, Portland, Oregon 97201 Attn: CC2035 Testimony

Read the Amendments Report and the Additional Amendments. (Note: Written testimony will only be taken on Council amendments.)

Vote on amendments moved to March 7 at 2 p.m.

Commissioners originally were scheduled to vote on their amendments to the CC2035 Plan on March 8, 2018, at 2 p.m. That vote has moved up one day; Council will now vote on the amendments at 2 p.m. on March 7.

The final vote on the entire plan is scheduled for May 24, 2018, at 2:30 p.m.

Last Day to Mail Ballots for the January 23, 2018 Election

Thursday, January 18 is the last day to safely mail ballots: Voters can get help voting or pick up a replacement ballot at two locations in Multnomah County.

Thursday, January 18 is the last day for voters to safely mail their ballot for the Special Election onTuesday, January 23. Ballots can be mailed with one first class stamp. Voters are encouraged to return ballots promptly because of the possibility of inclement winter weather.

Ballot envelopes must be signed and ballots received by the elections office by January 23 at 8:00 PM. Postmarks do not count in Oregon.
Multnomah County Elections Offers Extended Hours
Multnomah County Elections normal hours at both the SE Portland (1040 SE Morrison Street) and Gresham (600 NE 8th Street) locations are 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Monday-Friday.
Multnomah County Elections extended hours at both locations:
  • 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM, Saturday, January 20
  • 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Monday, January 22
  • 7:00 AM – 8:00 PM, Tuesday, January 23 (Election Day)

Multnomah County voters can get a replacement ballot sent by mail or available to be picked up in-person at “Will Call” at our SE Portland or Gresham locations during business hours. A replacement ballot will be available at the elections service location within two hours of request. Order a replacement ballot online or by calling 503-988-3720.

January 2018 Special Election Resources

Residential Speed Limit Reduction Proposal

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

Portland City Council will consider a proposal on January 17, 2018, to reduce the speed limit on all residential streets to 20 miles per hour. If the ordinance passes, the Portland Bureau of Transportation will begin updating speed limit signs in February and expects to complete the process by April 1, 2018.

Residential streets make up around 70 percent of Portland’s street network and a large proportion of the city’s total public space. Reducing residential speeds is part of a broader citywide effort to support safe driving speeds on many types of streets.

20 mph speed limit would support safety

Most residential streets in Portland are narrow, have few marked crosswalks, and no bike lanes; given the tight space and lack of protection for people walking, using mobility devices, and biking, it is important that people drive slowly on residential streets.

The proposed 20 mph speed limit is part of Portland’s Vision Zero work to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. Slower driving speeds help prevent crashes and, when crashes occur, reduce the harm that results. A pedestrian hit by a driver at 25 mph is nearly twice as likely to die compared to someone hit at 20 mph (AAA, 2011/2013, Impact Speed and a Pedestrian’s Risk of Severe Injury or Death).

Sign installation would start in February

If Portland City Council approves the new residential speed limit, PBOT will adjust speed limit signage beginning in February 2018 and continue through March. PBOT would double the number of residential speed limit signs, installing approximately 2,000 across the city. At some locations, existing signs would be relocated to maximize their effectiveness.

As is the case today, not every residential street would have a speed limit sign, but the 20 mph speed limit would be in effect on all residential streets.

More information:

January Meeting TONIGHT!

Don’t miss our monthly meeting, TONIGHT, January 4th, 2018, 7:00-9:00PM at the Brentwood-Darlington Community Center, featuring special guest Senator Rod Monroe.  Doors open at 6:30PM.  View, download, and print our agenda here.

¡Tendremos intérpretes traduciendo al Español!

Errol Heights Online Survey – 3 Days Left!

From PBOT:

Do you support a shared street design or a sidewalk on one side of the street?

The biggest design question that we are currently working through is whether to advance the design with a shared-street concept or to include a sidewalk on one side. This design applies to 48th, 49th, 51st, Tenino Drive, and Nehalem. The rest of the streets in the project area require sidewalks. Several people used our yellow and red dot map at the open house to indicate their preference, and we’d like to hear from everyone else.

To help inform the decision, we have put together an info sheet about both designs available for download here.

If you haven’t already, please take a few minutes to fill out our brief survey by January 5, 2018.
Take the survey >>

This feedback will directly influence the final design for SE 48th, 49th, 51st, Tenino Drive, and Nehalem St.

Next steps

  • Property owners fill out online survey stating preference for a shared street or sidewalk on one side design by January 5th, 2018
  • PBOT analyzes feedback and makes final design decision by the end of January 2018
  • LID meetings scheduled for February and March – more information forthcoming

Contact us via email with questions in the meantime.

Alert: PBOT prepares for possible flooding on Johnson Creek

Potential for limited flooding along Johnson Creek between 10:00 p.m. tonight through the evening of Friday, December 29.

(Dec. 28, 2017) The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) warns the traveling public that the potential for heavy rain, combined with melting snow, could cause limited flooding along Johnson Creek between 10:00 p.m. tonight through the evening of Friday, December 29.

The National Weather Service has issued a flood watch for portions of Northwest Oregon and southwest Washington, including Johnson Creek. A Flood Watch means there is a potential for flooding based on current forecasts.

To help residents and business owners prepare for a flood emergency, PBOT makes free sand and sandbags available at no charge to anyone who wants to use them to protect their property from flood damage. No shovels are provided, so the public must bring their own. The sandbag sites are located at:

  • SE 88th Avenue just south of Holgate Boulevard in the parking lot at Lents Park. Enter parking lot at the bottom of the hill, and follow one-way traffic to the sand pile at the exit on the east side of SE 88th;
  • SE 111th Avenue and Harold Street at the southeast corner of the intersection; and
  • SW 42nd Avenue and Vermont Street in the lower parking lot of Gabriel Park; enter Gabriel Park from Vermont.

Location details for the three City-operated sandbag sites can also be found at http://bit.ly/pdxsand.

In the event of flooding, PBOT is prepared to close travel lanes and/or streets.

Should streets need to be closed, PBOT asks the traveling public to obey all road closed signs. Do not move them or drive around them. The roads have been closed because of hazardous conditions. If drivers ignore the signs, they are potentially putting themselves, other travelers and PBOT crews at risk.

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The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) is the steward of the City’s transportation system, and a community partner in shaping a livable city. We plan, build, manage and maintain an effective and safe transportation system that provides access and mobility. Learn more at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation