LID Packets Hit Mailboxes Soon

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

LID Petition Packets Mailed Week of April 16th 

In the next week, expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by May 30, 2018

LID Informational Sessions at Errol Heights Park

Questions about the LID or your individual assessment? Meet with PBOT project team (and also have the chance to turn in your vote in person). All meetings will be in the park across from the Community Garden. Look for the white tent and drop in anytime during the hours below.

  • April 30, 7 AM – 9 AM
  • May 3, 5 PM – 7 PM
  • May 4, 11 AM – 1 PM

Unable to make any of the meeting times? Let us know and we can set up a phone call or in-person meeting at a separate time.

Next Steps and Timeline

May 30: Petitions due to PBOT. If over 50% of property owners in proposed LID support its formation, a City Council hearing date will be set.

June 27: Target City Council hearing date

  • 21 calendar days prior to council hearing: mailers will be sent out to each property owner with hearing and LID details
  • 14 calendar days prior to council hearing: two notices of intent to form LID published in a paper of general circulation in the City and two signs placed within the LID boundary
  • 7 calendar days prior to council hearing: remonstrances against LID formation due to City Auditor in writing (delivered in person or by first class U.S. mail to: 1221 SW 4th AVE. Room 310, Portland OR 97204)

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Project contact info:

errolheights@portlandoregon.gov

 Elizabeth Mahon, Project Manager: 503.823.0396

 David Backes, Capital Project Assistant: 503.823.5811

NOTE: Elizabeth will be out of the office April 6-24. David will be answering questions in her absence.

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

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Request for Support for Public Safety

From Mayor Wheeler’s Office:

As the 2018-2019 budget season is well underway, the Mayor’s Office would like to encourage our constituents with public safety concerns to give testimony in support of Portland Police Bureau’s budget request. Public safety in our community is in jeopardy.

The bureau is requesting funds for 93 additional sworn officers, and nine additional non-sworn professional positions. These requests support the Mayor’s key priorities of increasing public safety and police accountability, maintaining the City’s critical infrastructure, and enhancing livability. The bureau’s requests for additional ongoing resources will advance the bureau’s mission and goals to provide 21st Century Policing services, to support organizational excellence and inclusion, and to rebuild police units so they can better deliver community policing to all residents.

Staffing within the PPB has been a critical issue for the bureau for many years, and there are several factors that impact this issue: recruitment and hiring, attrition and number of officers.

There are the fewer officers in the bureau as there were a decade ago, despite a 10 percent increase in Portland’s population. This request would increase the number of officer positions by approximately 10 percent–on par with Portland’s growth.

The Portland Police Bureau continues to face challenges in patrol staffing, which has led to declining response times. In the last five years, total 911 call volume has increased by over 22%. These calls include a 97% increase in stolen vehicle calls, 64% increase in unwanted persons calls and a 32% increase in disorder calls.

Without an increase in staffing, the response time for these calls will only grow, threatening the safety of all Portlanders.  We urge constituents with any public safety concerns to voice their support for this proposed budget.

Your voice in this conversation is essential, and we urge constituents to either submit written testimony, contact city commissioners or attend one of the upcoming community budget events:

Community Budget Forums

April 17, 2018, 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Roosevelt High School
6941 N Central St, 97203
Bus lines 44 and 75
Most testimony by random drawing

Budget Committee Hearings

May 10, 2018, 6:00pm – 8:30pm, hearing to receive public testimony
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Ave., Portland, OR 97204

May 16, 2018, 2:00pm, Council Action to approve City Budget, testimony heard
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Ave., Portland, OR 97204

Utility Rate Review
May 17, 2018 (first reading), 2:00pm, second reading May 23, 2018, time TBD
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Ave., Portland, OR 97204

TSCC Public Hearing
June 6, 2018, 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Rose Room, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Ave, Portland, OR 97204

Council Action to Adopt Budget
June 7, 2018, 2:00pm
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Ave, Portland, OR 97204

Paving Project on SE 50th Avenue

PBOT News Release:

SE 50th Avenue Paving Project kicks off 2018 Fixing Our Streets construction season.  PBOT to invest a total of $105 million in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation broke ground today on the SE 50th Avenue Paving Project, the first Fixing Our Streetsproject of the 2018 construction season. The first of 19 projects breaking ground between March and August, the $1.1 million project will pave the street from SE Hawthorne to SE Division and update street corners with ADA ramps to prevent further pavement deterioration and improve overall street accessibility. Work on SE 50th Avenue will require intermittent lane and sidewalk closures as workers begin curb ramp construction on the 26 street corners slated for ADA curb ramp upgrades through late May, before requiring additional lane closures and detours for paving work in June. The project will be completed in late June.

The 19 projects going to construction this spring and summer range from a $200,000 Neighborhood Greenway on SW/NW 20th to a $3.5 million paving project on SW Vermont Street from SW Oleson Road to SW Capitol Highway. In total, approximately $20 million in Fixing Our Streets projects will begin construction in the next six months.

Construction will impact neighborhoods across the city, with projects taking place in all five quadrants of the city. Among them:

East Portland:

North Portland:

NE Portland:

SE Portland:

NW Portland:

SW Portland:

In addition, PBOT’s maintenance bureau workers continue their ongoing, Fixing Our Streets funded work of guard rail replacement and base repair street replacement. Fixing Our Streets projects make up approximately 20 percent of the investments in Portland’s transportation infrastructure this construction season, with a total of approximately $105 million being invested in capital projects, street repair and safety between now and September 2018.

The Fixing Our Streets program, paid for by a local gas tax approved by Portland voters in May 2016 and a heavy vehicle use tax, is Portland’s first street repair and traffic safety program financed with local funding. 56 percent of Fixing Our Streets funding is invested in street maintenance and 44 percent is invested in safety improvements. The City Council ordinance included a project list that shows specific projects that are intended to be funded. The list of projects can be found at www.fixingourstreets.com.

About the Fixing Our Streets Program

The Fixing Our Streets program is the result of the passage of Measure 26-173, a 10-cent tax on motor vehicle fuels and Portland’s first local funding source dedicated to street repair and traffic safety projects. Passed on May 17, 2016, Measure 26-173 will raise an estimated $64 million over four years. PBOT will invest this money in a wide variety of street improvement and safety projects across the entire city. Fixing Our Streets will help PBOT expand preventive street maintenance that saves money and prevents potholes. It will support our work to make it safer for children to walk to school. It will allow us to build more sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights and bike lanes. The Portland City Council also unanimously passed a Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, for vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, which will also fund the Fixing Our Streets program.

Errol Heights Update and Next Steps

From Portland Bureau of Transportation:

Thank you to everyone who completed the recent online survey regarding street design for the Errol Heights Street Improvement Project. Survey respondents strongly preferred the less expensive shared-street design (votes came in 3 to 1 for this treatment).

The shared street design applies to 48th, 49th, 51st, Tenino Drive, and Nehalem Street, while SE Tenino Court and SE Malden Drive both require sidewalk on one side (see map below for properties included in the LID).

With your feedback, we were able to go in to more detail on the design and have completed a cost estimate for the project.

It is now time for LID participants to submit petitions for the project.

In the next month, please expect an information and petition packet that will include:

  • A petition for each property
  • Cost estimate details
  • Individual property assessments (costs for each property)
  • Renderings of the project design
  • An LID boundary map
  • A pre-paid envelope to mail your petition back to PBOT by April 30, 2018

LID Info sessions – 1st week of April:

The mailer will also include details of upcoming meetings where Errol Heights neighbors can come speak with PBOT staff about the LID process and ask questions about their individual LID assessments. The location and times are TBD but will be near the neighborhood, with morning, daytime, and evening sessions. These dates will also be posted on the project website.

For any questions in the meantime, please get in touch with us and keep an eye on the project website for the most up-to-date information.

Project contact info: Elizabeth Mahon

503.823.0396

portlandoregon.gov/transportation/errolh

Parks Budget Process Update – March 2018

A Letter from Portland Parks and Recreation:
Dear Parks Community,
When I last updated you in January 2018 on the City of Portland Budget Process, it was to share that we had just submitted the final Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) Requested Budget. In accordance with the Mayor’s budget direction, we submitted a proposed budget that identified reductions equaling approximately 5% of our ongoing General Fund Budget (approximately $3.27 million). Our Requested Budget closely mirrored the recommendations of the Parks Budget Advisory Committee (BAC).
City Budget Office Budget Review
After we submitted our Requested Budget, it was reviewed by the City Budget Office (CBO) whose job is to analyze and highlight the key budget and program performance issues that the CBO believes Council should consider during the budget process. Recently, the CBO released their review of our budget. In their Budget Review, the City Budget Office recommended to that Council take 4% of the reductions submitted by PP&R. This would amount to reducing the PP&R budget by $2.1 million. This level of cuts will significantly impact our programs. In addition to the ongoing General Fund reductions, the CBO also recommends an ongoing increase to our major maintenance funds and some one-time funding for campsite cleanups and capital projects.

Several of you have asked why we are making cuts when the economy appears to be doing well.  While we are in a period of economic growth, the CBO is forecasting a $1.5 million gap to the citywide Ongoing General Fund due to higher inflation, labor costs and PERS. In order to offset the $1.5 million ongoing deficit and create room for priority investments (including housing and public safety), the CBO recommends $5.0 million in ongoing reductions citywide. A net reduction of $2.1 million from the PP&R budget will make up almost half of the recommended General Fund reductions. We are disappointed that the CBO review shows PP&R taking this level of General Fund reduction. If taken, these reductions would impact almost every segment of our organization.

Our Requested Budget was strongly grounded in the Values developed and adopted by successive BAC’s. After years of refinement, the Values reflect our commitment to equity, safety, strategic thinking, partnerships, maintenance, core programming and volunteerism. A $2.1 million reduction to our budget would severely limit our ability to deliver core programs and services.

The Budget Process—NEXT STEPS
On Friday, March 16, PP&R participated in a work session with City Council where PP&R presented the impacts of the reductions on our work and our proposed Add Packages. In the coming months, the following steps will take place:

  • April 3 and 17, Community Budget Forums—There are several community budget forums where you, as Portlanders, can give direct budget feedback to City Council
– April 3, 2018, 6:30pm – 8:30pm
David Douglas High School
1001 SE 135th Avenue, 97233
– April 17, 2018, 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Roosevelt High School
6941 N Central Street, 97203

  • April 30, Release of the Mayor’s Proposed Budget—Mayor Wheeler will use the information provided by the CBO, PP&R staff, and the public to develop the Mayor’s Proposed Budget. 
  • Finalizing an Adopted Budget—City Council will then deliberate, a Budget Committee hearing will be held on May 10, and Council expects to continue to hear testimony from you, the community, and then they will approve the City Budget on May 16, 2018.
– May 10, 2018, 6:00pm – 8:30pm, hearing to receive public testimony
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Avenue, Portland, OR 97204
– May 16, 2018, 2:00pm, Council Action to approve City Budget, testimony heard
Council Chambers, Portland City Hall
1221 SW 4th Avenue, Portland, OR 97204


Helpful Links

I know that the budget process can be difficult, especially with the possible reductions that are on the table for discussion. Several of these are programs and sites for which you, as our Parks community, care deeply and already work hard to partner with us on.

If you have questions regarding the budget or the budget process, please let your liaison know or reach out to Elizabeth Kennedy-Wong at elizabeth.kennedy-wong@portlandoregon.gov.

Thank you for your time and interest in our parks system,

…Mike

Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft

The Map Refinement Project will evaluate and amend the Comprehensive Plan Map and/or Zoning Map on specific sites for consistency with the recently adopted 2035 Comprehensive Plan.

Following City Council’s direction to explore additional map changes in December 2016, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability kicked off the Map Refinement Project in April 2017. A Discussion Draft was released in June 2017, followed by public review and comments. Project staff subsequently released a Proposed Draft in September 2017. This was followed by a hearing before the Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) in October 2017, which drew 176 items of testimony. On November 14, 2017, the PSC voted on their recommendation to City Council.

With the February 5 release of the Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft to City Council, the public will have time to review the PSC’s recommendations and provide testimony to City Council through winter/early spring.

CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING
Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft

March 14, 2018
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
1221 SW 4th Avenue

Council will hear testimony on the Map Refinement Project Comprehensive Plan designation and zoning map changes. Additional hearing dates may be scheduled.

See the Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft.

HOW TO TESTIFY

Individuals will have two minutes to speak and may sign up to testify starting at 1 p.m. on March 14. Sign up is first come, first served. Each person in line can sign up for one 2-minute testimony slot.

You may also testify by:

Map App: https://www.portlandmaps.com/bps/mapapp/maps.html#mapTheme=mrp

Emailcpmaprefinement@portlandoregon.gov; include “Map Refinement Project Testimony” in the subject line

U.S. Mail
Portland City Council c/o Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100, 
Portland, OR 97201
Attn: Map Refinement Project Testimony

Review Testimony as it comes in

Community members can view all testimony as it comes in via the online Testimony Reader:
www.portlandmaps.com/bps/testimony

Next steps

Following the public hearing, Mayor Ted Wheeler will “close the public record” (i.e., in person and written testimony will no longer be taken). Council will then deliberate on the project at one or more additional sessions. Commissioners may introduce new amendments based on public testimony. A final vote on the Map Refinement Project is anticipated in May 2018. The map changes will become effective potentially in June 2018.

East Precinct Neighborhood Training

The Neighborhood Training by the East Precinct Neighborhood Response Team (NRT) Sgt. Teig, is designed to provide information, resources, and materials available to mitigate public safety and livability issues in East Precinct neighborhoods.   

Training Dates:

  • Saturday, February 10th, 10:00AM-12:00PM
  • Saturday, March 10th, 10:00AM-12:00PM

Trainings are held at the East Precinct Community Room located at 737 SE 106th Ave, Portland, OR 97216.

About the training: This training is geared towards community members, who will then be able to train/share this information with other neighbors. The purpose of the training is to equip you with the tools necessary to train and engage your respective community members regarding East Precinct initiatives about public safety and livability issues. The training is designed to provide information and materials needed to navigate the different resources available for mitigating these issues.

To attend, RSVP to Marianna Lomanto, Crime Prevention Coordinator at Office of Neighborhood Involvement.