E-Zone Map Correction Project

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BDNA NOTE: A representative from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability will be at our August 2nd BDNA general meeting to talk about and answer questions for this project.

The E-zone Map Correction Project will adjust the location of Portland’s environmental overlay zones to match locations of existing streams, wetlands, steep slopes and vegetation as required by the new Comprehensive Plan. The environmental overlay zones protect natural resources that are essential for watershed health. The environmental overlay zones were applied to properties through officially adopted conservation plans around Portland starting in 1989 and completed in 2003.  With the new Natural Resources Inventory in 2012 it became obvious that some resources that are supposed to be protected (like stream segments) are not, while other lands have regulations but no natural resources. This project will correct that. If your property will be considered for remapping as part of this project, you will receive a postcard in the mail. The postcard will let you know where you can get more information about potential changes on your property.

Contact Mindy Brooks, 503-823-7831 or mindy.brooks@portlandoregon.gov for more information.  Check the website for meeting dates and events, www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/e-zone.

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Neighborhood Clean-Up 2018!

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BDNA 2018 Clean-Up - Facebook Post

Join us for our annual neighborhood clean-up event!

Bring your bulky waste, scrap metal and wood, furniture, yard debris, and more!

Suggested Donation: Car $20, Truck/Van $30, Trailer $15, Mattresses $5. NO COMMERCIAL LOADS! We accept cash, checks, and cards. Please make checks out to, “BDNA.” Look for our flier in the May issue of the The Bee to save $5!

So what is “bulky waste”? Things like chairs, sofas, lamps, mattresses, old doors, piles of cardboard or bales of old newspapers, or anything else that cannot be left curbside for regular waste pick-up. We also accept scrap metal like old metal chairs, poles, wire, cable, ducts, and locks. Plus, drop off your yard waste that can’t go in the compost bin; like branches, vines, bushes, small trees, and stumps.

As per Metro, we cannot accept:

  • Building/construction/demolition materials, including:
  • Flooring: vinyl tiles, vinyl sheet, mastic
  • Walls: Painted wood, plaster, decorative plaster
  • Siding: cement siding, shingles, “Transite
  • Ceilings: acoustical tiles, “popcorn” and spray-on texture
  • Insulation: spray-applied, blown-in, vermiculite
  • Electrical: wire insulation, panel partitions
  • Other: fire doors, fire brick, fire proofing
  • Home and office appliances
  • Computers/components, monitors or TVs
  • Kitchen garbage/food waste
  • Refrigerators/freezers or air conditioners (containing Freon or ammonia)
  • Hazardous waste
  • Batteries (all kinds)
  • Paint
  • Chemicals
  • Toilets
  • Tires
  • Railroad ties
  • Barrels
  • Propane tanks
  • Explosives
  • Lead containing materials
  • Oil, mercury, or PCBs
  • Fluorescent bulbs & ballast

RSVP for this event on Facebook or NextDoor to stay up to date!

Want to save $5?

Download and print our flier or look for it in The BEE newspaper.

Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft

The Map Refinement Project will evaluate and amend the Comprehensive Plan Map and/or Zoning Map on specific sites for consistency with the recently adopted 2035 Comprehensive Plan.

Following City Council’s direction to explore additional map changes in December 2016, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability kicked off the Map Refinement Project in April 2017. A Discussion Draft was released in June 2017, followed by public review and comments. Project staff subsequently released a Proposed Draft in September 2017. This was followed by a hearing before the Planning and Sustainability Commission (PSC) in October 2017, which drew 176 items of testimony. On November 14, 2017, the PSC voted on their recommendation to City Council.

With the February 5 release of the Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft to City Council, the public will have time to review the PSC’s recommendations and provide testimony to City Council through winter/early spring.

CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING
Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft

March 14, 2018
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
1221 SW 4th Avenue

Council will hear testimony on the Map Refinement Project Comprehensive Plan designation and zoning map changes. Additional hearing dates may be scheduled.

See the Map Refinement Project Recommended Draft.

HOW TO TESTIFY

Individuals will have two minutes to speak and may sign up to testify starting at 1 p.m. on March 14. Sign up is first come, first served. Each person in line can sign up for one 2-minute testimony slot.

You may also testify by:

Map App: https://www.portlandmaps.com/bps/mapapp/maps.html#mapTheme=mrp

Emailcpmaprefinement@portlandoregon.gov; include “Map Refinement Project Testimony” in the subject line

U.S. Mail
Portland City Council c/o Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100, 
Portland, OR 97201
Attn: Map Refinement Project Testimony

Review Testimony as it comes in

Community members can view all testimony as it comes in via the online Testimony Reader:
www.portlandmaps.com/bps/testimony

Next steps

Following the public hearing, Mayor Ted Wheeler will “close the public record” (i.e., in person and written testimony will no longer be taken). Council will then deliberate on the project at one or more additional sessions. Commissioners may introduce new amendments based on public testimony. A final vote on the Map Refinement Project is anticipated in May 2018. The map changes will become effective potentially in June 2018.

Better Housing by Design

From Portland’s Bureau of Planning & Sustainability:

Better Housing by Design draft Zoning Code amendments now available for review

How can Portland’s multi-dwelling zones be improved to ensure more people live in safe and healthy housing that meets their needs?

The Better Housing by Design project team has been addressing that question for the past year. With the help of community members, multi-family housing developers, renter advocates and others, the team developed the Better Housing by Design Concept Report.

Now proposed zoning code and map amendments to implement the concepts for Portland’s multi-dwelling zones are available for public review in the BHD Discussion Draft.

Read the Better Housing by Design Discussion Draft.

WHAT’S IN THE DISCUSSION DRAFT?

The proposed code changes will help ensure that new development in Portland’s multi-dwelling zones better meets the needs of current and future residents as well as contributes positive qualities to the places where they are built.

The Discussion Draft proposals will shape new development in the multi-dwelling zones by:

  • Revising the multi-dwelling zones so they relate to different types of places.
  • Regulating development intensity by the size of buildings, instead of the number of units in the building.
  • Adding incentives for affordable housing.
  • Requiring shared outdoor spaces like courtyards for larger projects.
  • Encouraging innovative green features and tree preservation.
  • Limiting front garages and surface parking.
  • Shaping building scale and setbacks to integrate development with neighborhoods.
  • Applying standards for East Portland for better design suited to the area’s characteristics.

Learn more and comment

Portlanders are invited to learn more about the Discussion Draft and give their feedback in the coming weeks. This public outreach period is focused on familiarizing community members with the detailed code amendments in preparation for the Planning and Sustainability Commission and subsequent City Council hearings later this year.

Comments on the Discussion Draft are due by March 19, 2018.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Two open houses will give community members a chance to review the proposals and talk to staff. The project team will provide a presentation summarizing the proposals and be available to answer questions.

Central Portland

Wednesday, January 31, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
1900 SW 4th Avenue, Room 2500 (2nd floor)
TriMet:  Multiple bus, MAX and streetcar lines

Eastern Portland

Thursday, February 8, 2018, 6 – 8 p.m.
9955 NE Glisan Street (Ride Connection Office)
TriMet: Bus #15 and 19; MAX Blue, Green, Red lines

HOW TO COMMENT

Comments are due by Monday, March 19, 2018. Send your comments to:

E-mail: betterhousing@portlandoregon.gov

Mail:
City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
Attn: Better Housing by Design Project
1900 SW 4th Avenue, Suite 7100
Portland, OR  97201

Deadline for Written Testimony on the CC2035 Plan Extended

Deadline for written testimony on the CC2035 Plan extended to Monday, January 22 at noon.

January 18, 2018, the Portland City Council held a public hearing on their draft amendments to the Central City 2035 Plan. Roughly 70 people testified in person on these amendments to the new long-range plan.

At Commissioner Fritz’s suggestions, Council agreed to extend the deadline for written testimony – on the amendments only – until noon on Monday, January 22, 2018. Testifiers may submit their testimony by email or in person.

  • Email: cc2035@portlandoregon.gov
  • In person: Portland City Council c/o Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, 1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100, Portland, Oregon 97201 Attn: CC2035 Testimony

Read the Amendments Report and the Additional Amendments. (Note: Written testimony will only be taken on Council amendments.)

Vote on amendments moved to March 7 at 2 p.m.

Commissioners originally were scheduled to vote on their amendments to the CC2035 Plan on March 8, 2018, at 2 p.m. That vote has moved up one day; Council will now vote on the amendments at 2 p.m. on March 7.

The final vote on the entire plan is scheduled for May 24, 2018, at 2:30 p.m.

Upcoming Council Sessions and Public Hearing on Central City 2035 Plan

From Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:

City Council will focus on green buildings, bonuses and transfers, and more.

On November 29, 2017, City Council continued their deliberations on the CC2035 Plan. The draft agenda and materials for the meeting are now available for review – CLICK HERE.

The package is separated into amendments that need discussion, such as green buildings, the Willamette River, and bonuses and transfers, as well as items that are minor and technical and may not need discussion. Items that are moved and seconded will be included in the amendments document for a public hearing on January 18, 2018. The materials for the public hearing will be published on January 4, 2018.

ADDITIONAL COUNCIL SESSIONS AND PUBLIC HEARING

December 6, 2017  
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
January 3, 2018 (if needed)
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
Public Hearing on Amendments
January 18, 2018

Council Chambers
2 p.m., time certain (amendments package to be published on January 4, 2018)
About the Central City 2035 Plan
The Central City 2035 Plan will provide goals, policies and tools designed to make the Central City more vibrant, innovative, sustainable and resilient than it is today. A place that every Portlander can be proud to call their own. The plan replaces the 1988 Central City Plan as the primary guiding policy document for the Central City Plan District. The Central City Plan will be the first amendment to the City’s updated Comprehensive Plan, implementing the Portland Plan as it applies to the Central City.
Questions? Call the Central City Helpline at 503-823-4286 or email BPS at cc2035@portlandoregon.gov.

Review and comment on the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft

News from the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

Draft Off-road Cycling Master Plan includes recommendations for trials and bike parks for people of all ages and abilities.
Learn more online or at upcoming open houses; then submit your comments by Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017.
Portland, ORE. — With the help of a project advisory committee, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability has released the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft for public review and comment.
The Off-road Cycling Master Plan blends a citywide vision with a practical and realistic approach to increasing the opportunity for off-road cycling across Portland. The master plan recommends locations for three different types of bike facilities:
Take a “ride” through the online open house to learn more about the recommendations for off-road cycling trails and bike parks throughout the city.
Community members can comment in the following ways:
Project staff will consider public comments before they forward final recommendations to City Council in 2018. The comment period for the Off-Road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft ends atmidnight on Sunday, December 31, 2017.
Four open houses throughout the city
Learn more about the proposals, talk to staff and submit comments at one of the community events.
Thursday, November 30, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Charles Jordan Community Center
9009 N Foss Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #4
Monday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Southwest Community Center
6820 SW 45th Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #1
Thursday, December 7, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
East Portland Community Center
740 SE 106th Avenue
TriMet Bus Routes #15, 20
Wednesday, December 13, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Matt Dishman Community Center
77 NE Knott Street
TriMet Bus Routes #4, 6, 24, 44
Background
The project team combined community input from thousands of Portlanders with feedback from City property managers and the Project Advisory Committee to develop the Discussion Draft of the Off-road Cycling Master Plan. The Discussion Draft also draws on best practices, additional planning and visits to more complicated properties by environmental and off-road cycling specialists.
The Discussion Draft aims to support equity by bringing off-road cycling trails and bike parks to neighborhoods that have traditionally not had access to these types of places. The goal is to create more places to ride that are easy to get to from all neighborhoods by bike or transit.
The Discussion Draft also includes recommendations to ensure people of all ages, skill levels, and incomes can take part in off-road cycling. The recommendations also incorporate best practices on how to design facilities to create safe and sustainable trails. The result is a map of recommended sites for new trails and bicycle parks as well as many recommendations for how to create a safe, sustainable and successful system.
For more information, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/offroadcycling