Deadline for Written Testimony on the CC2035 Plan Extended

Deadline for written testimony on the CC2035 Plan extended to Monday, January 22 at noon.

January 18, 2018, the Portland City Council held a public hearing on their draft amendments to the Central City 2035 Plan. Roughly 70 people testified in person on these amendments to the new long-range plan.

At Commissioner Fritz’s suggestions, Council agreed to extend the deadline for written testimony – on the amendments only – until noon on Monday, January 22, 2018. Testifiers may submit their testimony by email or in person.

  • Email: cc2035@portlandoregon.gov
  • In person: Portland City Council c/o Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, 1900 SW 4th Ave., Suite 7100, Portland, Oregon 97201 Attn: CC2035 Testimony

Read the Amendments Report and the Additional Amendments. (Note: Written testimony will only be taken on Council amendments.)

Vote on amendments moved to March 7 at 2 p.m.

Commissioners originally were scheduled to vote on their amendments to the CC2035 Plan on March 8, 2018, at 2 p.m. That vote has moved up one day; Council will now vote on the amendments at 2 p.m. on March 7.

The final vote on the entire plan is scheduled for May 24, 2018, at 2:30 p.m.

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Upcoming Council Sessions and Public Hearing on Central City 2035 Plan

From Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:

City Council will focus on green buildings, bonuses and transfers, and more.

On November 29, 2017, City Council continued their deliberations on the CC2035 Plan. The draft agenda and materials for the meeting are now available for review – CLICK HERE.

The package is separated into amendments that need discussion, such as green buildings, the Willamette River, and bonuses and transfers, as well as items that are minor and technical and may not need discussion. Items that are moved and seconded will be included in the amendments document for a public hearing on January 18, 2018. The materials for the public hearing will be published on January 4, 2018.

ADDITIONAL COUNCIL SESSIONS AND PUBLIC HEARING

December 6, 2017  
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
January 3, 2018 (if needed)
2 p.m., time certain
Council Chambers
Public Hearing on Amendments
January 18, 2018

Council Chambers
2 p.m., time certain (amendments package to be published on January 4, 2018)
About the Central City 2035 Plan
The Central City 2035 Plan will provide goals, policies and tools designed to make the Central City more vibrant, innovative, sustainable and resilient than it is today. A place that every Portlander can be proud to call their own. The plan replaces the 1988 Central City Plan as the primary guiding policy document for the Central City Plan District. The Central City Plan will be the first amendment to the City’s updated Comprehensive Plan, implementing the Portland Plan as it applies to the Central City.
Questions? Call the Central City Helpline at 503-823-4286 or email BPS at cc2035@portlandoregon.gov.

Review and comment on the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft

News from the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

Draft Off-road Cycling Master Plan includes recommendations for trials and bike parks for people of all ages and abilities.
Learn more online or at upcoming open houses; then submit your comments by Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017.
Portland, ORE. — With the help of a project advisory committee, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability has released the Off-road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft for public review and comment.
The Off-road Cycling Master Plan blends a citywide vision with a practical and realistic approach to increasing the opportunity for off-road cycling across Portland. The master plan recommends locations for three different types of bike facilities:
Take a “ride” through the online open house to learn more about the recommendations for off-road cycling trails and bike parks throughout the city.
Community members can comment in the following ways:
Project staff will consider public comments before they forward final recommendations to City Council in 2018. The comment period for the Off-Road Cycling Master Plan Discussion Draft ends atmidnight on Sunday, December 31, 2017.
Four open houses throughout the city
Learn more about the proposals, talk to staff and submit comments at one of the community events.
Thursday, November 30, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Charles Jordan Community Center
9009 N Foss Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #4
Monday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Southwest Community Center
6820 SW 45th Avenue
TriMet Bus Route #1
Thursday, December 7, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
East Portland Community Center
740 SE 106th Avenue
TriMet Bus Routes #15, 20
Wednesday, December 13, 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Matt Dishman Community Center
77 NE Knott Street
TriMet Bus Routes #4, 6, 24, 44
Background
The project team combined community input from thousands of Portlanders with feedback from City property managers and the Project Advisory Committee to develop the Discussion Draft of the Off-road Cycling Master Plan. The Discussion Draft also draws on best practices, additional planning and visits to more complicated properties by environmental and off-road cycling specialists.
The Discussion Draft aims to support equity by bringing off-road cycling trails and bike parks to neighborhoods that have traditionally not had access to these types of places. The goal is to create more places to ride that are easy to get to from all neighborhoods by bike or transit.
The Discussion Draft also includes recommendations to ensure people of all ages, skill levels, and incomes can take part in off-road cycling. The recommendations also incorporate best practices on how to design facilities to create safe and sustainable trails. The result is a map of recommended sites for new trails and bicycle parks as well as many recommendations for how to create a safe, sustainable and successful system.
For more information, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/offroadcycling

City of Portland Home Energy Score Requirement Beginning Soon

From City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:
City of Portland Home Energy Score requirement beginning soon 

Program provides new insight into energy use and costs of Portland homes.

Know the score. Outsmart energy waste. www.pdxhes.com

PORTLAND, Ore. – The City of Portland Home Energy Score ordinance will take effect on January 1, 2018, requiring sellers of single-family homes to disclose a Home Energy Report and Score at time of listing. Portland City Council unanimously adopted the policy (Portland City Code Chapter 17.108) in December 2016. This new policy will require people publicly selling single-family homes to obtain a Home Energy Report (which includes a Home Energy Score) from an authorized Home Energy Assessor. Complying with the policy takes two simple steps: getting the Home Energy Score and showing the Home Energy Score in any listing or public posting about the house.
Like a miles-per-gallon rating for a car, a Home Energy Score is an easy way for sellers, buyers, real estate professionals and builders to get directly comparable and credible information about a home’s energy performance across the housing market.

In advance of the policy taking effect, the City of Portland Home Energy Score website is now live at www.pdxhes.com.

  • For sellers, the website explains the necessary actions for completing the requirement and answers questions about logistics, how to get a home assessed and how to improve scores.
  • Buyers are guided through the Home Energy Report and are prompted to wrap energy improvement projects into financing.
  • Real-estate professionals can learn how to make the new policy work effortlessly for their clients and how to post scores online.
  • Builders can find information about how to obtain a score based on construction plans and possible exemptions and waivers.
  • The website is also a place to find out how to become a Home Energy Assessor.
Portland is the second city in the country, behind Berkeley, California, to approve a local ordinance requiring homes to be scored. The Home Energy Score and the Home Energy Report must be provided in any real-estate listings, such as RMLS, and must be made available to prospective buyers. Portland is the first city in the US to require energy scores this early in the homebuying process.
The adoption of the Home Energy Score ordinance is part of an effort to reduce carbon emissions in Multnomah County by 80 percent by 2050, outlined in the 2015 Climate Action Plan. Residential buildings contribute nearly half of all emissions from buildings, and while voluntary efforts have already made a difference, this policy will accelerate change and provide consumer insight and protection.

“A Home Energy Score lets buyers ‘see inside the walls’ of a home they’re considering for purchase, making the full costs of homeownership more visible to prospective buyers,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler. “Cutting the energy costs of housing is one of the smartest strategies to keep housing affordable over the long term. Beyond lowering energy bills, energy‐efficient homes are more comfortable and have better air quality. I’m proud that Portland is taking a stand for consumer protections and climate actionmaking it easier for people to save energy, protect against rising energy prices in the future and reduce carbon pollution.”

The scores will be produced by third-party Home Energy Assessors authorized by the City of Portland and Earth Advantage. The growing list of authorized professionals can be found atwww.earthadvantage.org/pdxhes/assessors.html. The price of the Home Energy Report is determined by the private sector, but Home Energy Assessments in similar programs in other communities range in price from $150 to $250. In 2018, the City will offer free Home Energy Scores for income-qualified sellers.
The Home Energy Assessment takes about an hour, and 70 pieces of information about insulation, windows, appliances and more are observed and recorded. As soon as the data from the assessment has been entered into the software, the Home Energy Score and Report will be available. Homes will be scored on a ten-point scale. If a home scores a 5, it is expected to perform comparably to an average home in Portland in terms of energy use. If a home scores a 10, it ranks among the ten percent of homes expected to use the least amount of energy. A home scoring a 1 is estimated to consume more energy each year than 85 percent of homes. Homes that have received a Home Energy Score will be viewable at the Portland Green Building Registry.
No action is required by the seller beyond providing the score and report in listings and in the home while it’s for sale, but if sellers or buyers are interested in making energy improvements, the nonprofit Enhabit offers free consultations with expert home energy advisors. For low-cost, do-it-yourself ways to cut energy waste, increase comfort and lower energy bills, Energy Trust of Oregon provides resources at www.energytrust.org/tips.
For more information, visit www.pdxhes.com, or contact HESinfo@portlandoregon.gov  or the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability at 503-823-5771

Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission October Meeting

From Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:

Attached is the agenda for the October 24, 2017 Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission meeting. The meeting will be live-streamed and then archived on the BPS YouTube Channel.

NOTE: This meeting will be held at the CH2M Building: 2020 SW 4th Ave, Lincoln Room (1st floor).

Public testimony will be taken for both the Map Refinement and Code Reconciliation projects. Testimony will be limited to 2 minutes per person and may be changed at the chair’s discretion.

A frequently-updated tentative schedule of upcoming PSC meetings is available at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/312882.

City Council to Hold Public Hearings on CC2035 Plan

The Portland City Council will consider the Recommended Draft Central City 2035 Plan at four public hearings this week and next. Community members are invited to testify at these hearings, which will be held in Council Chambers at City Hall, 1221 SW 4th Ave. in Downtown Portland.

Different aspects of the multi-volume plan will be considered by Council at different dates and times:

PUBLIC HEARING #1: September 7, 2017 @ 2:00PM, time certain (“Time certain” means the meeting will not start before this time.)
Volume 1: Goals and Policies
Volume 2A, Part 1: Central City Plan District
Volume 2A, Part 2: Willamette River and Trails
Volume 2B: Transportation System Plan
Volume 3A: Scenic Resources Protection Plan
Volume 3B: Willamette River Central Reach Natural Resources Protection Plan
Volume 5A: Implementation – Performance Targets and Action Plans
Volume 5B: Implementation – Green Loop

Draft Council Amendments
Council will hear public testimony on the bulk of the plan, including goals and policies, as well as proposed changes to the zoning code, zoning maps and other planning documents that implement the CC2035 policies. Council will also take testimony on the CC2035 Plan action charts and the Green Loop, a proposed Central City linear park.
Council will also take testimony on a package of amendments to the Recommended Draft CC2035 Plan offered by the Mayor and other Commissioners. The amendments document will be updated prior to the hearing.

PUBLIC HEARING #2
September 7, 2017 @ 4:30PM, time certain
Commissioners will consider early implementation of proposed increases to the maximum height and floor area limits on the US. Postal Service (USPS) site, located in the Pearl District. Early implementation is needed because of City funding contingencies and Prosper Portland’s need to begin marketing the site ahead of the anticipated March 2018 effective date of the CC2035 Plan.

Note: It is possible that Council may not be able to hear every person who signed up to testify on September 7. In that case, those individuals will have first chance to testify at the September 14 hearing, before those who sign up on September 14.

PUBLIC HEARING #3
September 14, 2017 @ 2:00PM, time certain
Council will hear testimony on the Recommended Draft New Chinatown/Japantown Historic District Design Guidelines. The new guidelines will serve as approval criteria for addition, alteration and new construction projects within the historic district.

Note: Any carryover testimony from the September 7 hearing will be heard prior to testimony on the guidelines.

PUBLIC HEARING #4
September 14, 2017 @ 2:45PM, time certain
Volume 2A, Part 3: Environmental and Scenic

Council will hear testimony on CC2035 plan-related amendments to environmental and scenic resource regulations that apply outside the Central City. A new standard is proposed for view corridors located in the scenic (s) overlay. It would allow tree and vegetation trimming and removal through a standard instead of environmental review to maintain important public views.

For more information, click here!

NEWS ALERT: Early Garbage Collection on September 4th and 5th

News from the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability:

The extreme heat and hazardous air quality forecasted for the first week of September could expose drivers from Portland’s garbage and recycling companies to potential health risks. Therefore, collection companies will get an early start on their daily collection runs, starting Monday, September 4th through Tuesday, September 5th, 2017.
The City asks that residential customers set out their garbage, recycling and composting roll carts the night before their collection day, as trucks may be out earlier than the usual 6:00AM start time.

“Collection truck drivers often work 10 to 11 hour days. Allowing them to start early will get them off the streets before the hottest temperatures and will reduce the chances of heat related illness,” said Kevin Veaudry Casaus, hauler operations manager at the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

Residential customers should contact their garbage and recycling company or the City of Portland’s Curbside Hotline, 503-823-7202, with any questions or concerns.